Sector Wide Not-For-Profit Study

Friday, May 29, 2015

The not-for-profit sector in Australia is at the very heart of our community and shapes and facilitates the values and spirit of our nation. From organisations that provide care and assistance to our nation’s most vulnerable, to those dedicated to providing aid and development overseas, to those who provide animal welfare, promote environmental causes, administer social welfare, and create community and belonging for Australians, the not-for-profit sector has an immeasurable impact on our society.

At McCrindle we conduct comprehensive research for many not-for-profit organisations. In these times of significant demographic growth, intergenerational transitions, rapid technological advancements and social change, the not-for-profit sector is faced with significant challenges in engaging with the new generations of supporters, identifying the most effective communication mediums and messages, understanding brand engagement and retention journeys of supporters and shaping a culture internally and externally to attract, engage and retain staff.

These trends are impacting the entire sector, and so the Australian Community Trends research study provides the opportunity for the sector as a whole to gain an understanding of the changes and practical strategies to respond.

Through conducting an industry wide study, participating organisations will benefit from the aggregated data which will identify trends and provide a comprehensive framework for understanding the behaviours of Australians when it comes to engaging with not-for-profits. Participating organisations receive their own data which can be then benchmarked against the national data. As well as adding significant breadth and depth to the strength of the research, this collaborative approach to an industry wide study will also provide valuable thought leadership material which will promote the work of the sector as a whole. The combined approach also allows for significant research to be conducted for organisations at a fraction of the price of a standard research project.

Partnering with McCrindle for this inaugural Australian Community Trends study is R2L, one of Australia’s leading not-for-profit fundraising and advertising agencies who bring a wealth of experience and expertise in helping not-for-profits strategically engage with their stakeholders.

More about the Australian Community Trends national study can be found here.

In summary, the research will involve 4 stages:

  1. A Nationally representative survey of 1,500 Australians which covers the key giving behaviours and awareness of organisations.
  2. Four qualitative focus groups will be run to expand on the survey findings and to provide greater context for them.
  3. A supporter survey will be run of your donors and their perspectives on giving, communication, future engagement.
  4. A survey of your internal stakeholders will be run including leaders and staff in your organisation to better understand their position on some of these issues.


For more information about the study please click here or contact Kirsten Brewer on (02) 8824 3422 or kirsten@mccrindle.com.au


Top 5 tips for survey design

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

At McCrindle we are well known for conducting relevant, world-class and cost effective research, and importantly, communicating the insights in innovative, useable ways.

Here are our top 5 tips for effective survey design:

  1. Clearly explain the purposes of the research
  2. Respondents will only answer questions if they think they are relevant or make sense to be asked. Explain the purpose of the research from the outset and respondents will be more comfortable answering because they will understand the context.

  3. Order questions intentionally
  4. Make sure the questions flow logically. Ease respondents into the survey but also ask the most important questions first as these are more likely to be answered. If it is a long survey or if there are lots of topics make visible headings and include a progress bar so respondents know how long they have to go.

  5. Be clear and explain
  6. Try to decipher the clearest and most simple way to ask each question. This may mean defining difficult words, laying out the timeframe the question refers to or giving instructions on how to fill in the question if it is unclear.

  7. Unweighted questions
  8. Try not to weight your questions to a particular side, e.g. avoid leading questions such as ‘Do you agree that Australia should become a republic?’

  9. Edit and then edit again!
  10. Make sure you proof your surveys, check the validation and logic. Do a survey preview several times to check everything works and then send it to a colleague to do the same.


For more information:

To find out more about our omnibus survey please download our McCrindle Omnibus Solutions Pack for more information:

The next omnibus is coming up, final questions are due on the 5th of June and the results will be sent to you on the 12th of June.

Q and A: Couple and Nuclear Families

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Are couples set to overtake nuclear families as the most common household in Australia, and if so, why?

For the first time in Australia's history, the nuclear family (couple with children) will no longer be the most common household – while today they make up 33% of all households, within a few years the couple only household will be the most common type of household.

There are a number of factors influencing this transition, including Generation Y couples having children later, and Baby Boomer households becoming empty nesters in record numbers.

Today the median age of parents is three years older than in 1984. The median age of mothers and fathers at new births is now 30.7 and 33 respectively. The increasing of the median age at new births means that households are remaining couple only for longer.

Besides couple only households, other household types are becoming more prevalent. Multi-generational households are on the increase with Baby Boomers being sandwiched between taking care of their parents (the builders) and their children (Gen Y) who are either studying whilst living at home or choosing to stay or return home after moving out, to combat the increasing costs of living out of home.

In addition to multi-generational homes, single person households are also on the increase and such is the impact of the ageing population that by 2036, solo person households will also be more numerous than nuclear families.

Additionally, the century-long trend of declining household size is set to continue. In 1911 there was 3.5 people per household while today there is an average of 2.6 people per household. However within a decade this will have dropped again to an average of 2.5 people. So Australian households and the generations that comprise them are very different today to those of the 20th Century.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

More on changing household structures can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.


Highlights from #TuesdayTrend

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

#TuesdayTrend

As Australia’s social researchers, we take the pulse of the nation. We research communities. We survey society. We analyse the trends. And we communicate the findings.

Every Tuesday we release a trend about Australia for #TuesdayTrend. Here are some of our recent #TuesdayTrends, highlighting fun facts about Australia. Be sure to follow, share and interact with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.



ABOUT RESEARCH VISUALISATION


In a world of big data- we’re for visual data. We believe in the democratisation of information- that research should be accessible to everyone not just to the stats junkies. We’re passionate about turning tables into visuals, data into videos and reports into presentations. As researchers, we understand the methods but we’re also designers and we know what will communicate, and how to best engage. We’re in the business of making you look good and your data make sense.


For more information, please get in touch – we’d love to hear from you:

W: researchvisualisation.com

E: info@researchvisualisation.com

P: +61 2 8824 3422

Q and A: The Sandwich Generation

Thursday, May 14, 2015

What is the ‘triple decker sandwich’ Baby Boomers are facing and what are the solutions?

Social and demographic changes, including the rising cost of living and house prices has led to changes in family configurations and living arrangements. The children of Baby Boomers, Generation Y, have significantly delayed the life marker of marriage, with the median age of first marriage now at 29.9 for a male and 28.3 for a female, as well as childbirth, with the median age of parents now 33 for a male and 30.8 for a female.

They are also delaying other lifemarkers of leaving home, starting their career and obtaining a mortgage more than ever before, and for the first time an entire generation of parents are entering their 60s while still providing financial and personal support to their children. Whilst the “couple with kids” household remains the most common household type in Australia, making up a third of Australia’s 9.1 million households, household structures are changing with a noticeable rise of the multi-generational household.

Generation Y have also been labelled the Boomerang Kids, as once they leave their family home, they often boomeranging back again, sometimes with a few kids in tow. Many Baby Boomers are not therefore downsizing the family home, but creating space for their adult children and grandchildren to live under the one roof. This type of arrangement is a significant financial advantage for Gen Y KIPPERS (Kids In Parents’ Pockets Eroding Retirement Savings) who may be saving $15,000 per year on rent alone by living with their parents. For mum and dad, however, retirement plans are delayed and retirement savings significantly decrease.

In addition to this, many of today’s Baby Boomers have an additional caring role of supporting their ageing parents, ‘sandwiching’ them between their adult children (and grandchildren) as well as their parents’ generation who are living longer – which is why they have been labeled the triple decker sandwich generation.

THE SOLUTIONS:
  1. Multigenerational households can provide great support networks for raising the next generations, but so that the pressure doesn’t fall unequally on the shoulders of one generation, have a plan to share the load of household jobs and responsibilities.
  2. Plan ahead for aged care options so the best care can be provided at each stage.
  3. Separate living spaces in the one house can provide opportunity for each generation to have their independence and space whilst still having shared time together.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

More on generational characteristics and transitioing can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.

McCrindle in the media

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

As Australia’s leading social researchers, the senior research team at McCrindle are actively involved in media commentary. From demographic analysis and future forecasts, to communication of key research findings and the identification of social trends, at McCrindle we are passionate about communicating insights in clear, accessible and useable ways.

We assist our clients in identifying newsworthy media angles in their research to assist them in communicating the insights effectively with the broader public.

Here are some of our recent media appearances:

McCrindle in the Media

A record 5 million Visas will be issued in 2015. The 5 million short term arrivals is great news for anyone in the tourism and education sector. But with this increase in population we need to make sure the investment is there in the cities as that's where the permanent arrivals are going to be, that is where the students are going to study and that's where the tourists are going to go.


Click here to watch Mark McCrindle address the topic on Weekend Today.

Australia is currently the fastest growing developed nation on the planet and by the end of this year we will hit 24 million – twice as many people we had in 1968. For the last decade numerically we’ve had the most growth we’ve ever had and in the next 5 years we will add nearly 2 million people to our population as well as nearly a million households. We’re currently adding a new Adelaide to our population every 3 years! (more than a million people; 355,000 each year).

Click here to watch social researcher Eliane Miles discuss the topic on Weekend Today.


What does the Australia of today really look like? With the typical length of employment being 3.3 years and Australians today working on average 17 jobs in their lifetime, we are seeing a shift from job stability to job flexibility. The rise of the couple only household means the nuclear family is on the decline. Because kids are staying at home longer, they've been named the KIPPERS (Kids in Parents Pockets Eroding Retirement Savings). And in the midst of the current baby boom, Australian's are having children later in life.

Click here to watch Research director Claire Madden give insight into these trends.



Forget the name Jack, now it's all about Jaaxxon. The McCrindle boys' list shows how times are changing. Although the same boring old names like Jack and Tom are right up the top, there's a spate of new names like Jayden (38), Tyler (41), Chase (56), Kai (58) and Braxton (77).

Click here to read the full article.




Most members of Generation Y are 'fiscally conservative' and have more money than debt, a new study has found. Generation Y were particularly vulnerable to current economic challenges and these had exacerbated existing inequalities, demographer Mark McCrindle of McCrindle Research said. "Generation Y are the new householders; they're emerging into their careers, they're right in the wealth accumulation life stage . . . so what's happened in the last decade has really hit them hard," he said.

Click here to read the full article.



Australia was a very different place 100 years ago. In 1915, you could buy a block of land for 200 pounds and milk was three pence per litre. Social research company McCrindle dug into the Australian Bureau of Statistics archives to see just how far we’ve come on the eve of the ANZAC Centenary.

Click here to read the full article.


Happy Mothers Day from McCrindle

Friday, May 08, 2015

As Australians, we love getting the chance to give back to our mothers, especially on Mother’s Day. Mother’s Day is regarded as the most meaningful ‘special day’ (nationally recognised days that are not public holidays) by Australians, superseding the importance placed on Remembrance Day, Valentine’s Day, and even Father’s Day. In fact, almost half of Australians rank Mother’s Day as their most significant special day of the year.

The first Mother’s Day in Australia was held in 1924, several years after it first began in the US in 1908. Interestingly, while 168 countries celebrate Mother’s Day as an established tradition, just over half of those countries (51%, Australia included) celebrate Mother’s Day do so on the second Sunday of May. Other countries have adapted an alternate date linked to women through historical significance or religious significance.

The Australian Bureau of statistics has compiled some interesting facts about Mums:

  • MORE: In 2012-13 there were 6,227,200 Australian women aged 18 and over who had given birth to children.
  • OLDER: In 2013, the median age of all mothers was 30.8 years, compared to 30.5 years in 2003.The age of first-time mothers varies quite a bit: In 2012-13, 11 per cent of all mums had their first child when under the age of 20 while 7% were 35 years or older when they had their first child.
  • WORKING: In 2012-13, 59% of Australian children (0-14 years) had mums who were employed: 37 per cent full time and 63% part time. In June 2014, 71% of working mums used alternative work arrangements to care for their children 0-12 years. Flexible work was used by 39%, part time work by 38% and 19% worked at home.
  • ENTREPRENEURIAL: Also in June 2014, almost two in five (38%) of women who ran their own business had children under 15, and nearly one in five (18%), had a child aged 0-5.*
  • LONGER: And some mums have their children at home for a long time - in 2012-13, 17% of 25-34 year olds had never moved out of home.

The original post by The Australian Bureau of Statistics can be found here.

Population Boom [in the media]

Thursday, May 07, 2015

This year a record 5 million VISA’s will be issued to foreign students, tourists and workers, with many of them choosing to call Australia home for good. The unprecedented boom is being likened to the influx that Australia experienced in the aftermath of WWII.

The 5 million short term arrivals are great news for anyone in the tourist and education sector. These sectors are two of our biggest export earners, they keep the economy going so to have more tourists and more students here is fantastic.

Adding an extra 2 million people, even short term is significant.

If you look at just permanent arrivals coming in to Australia and staying for 12 months or more, we are talking about the equivalent population of a new Gold Coast every 15 months.

6 of the Top 10 countries of permanent arrivals are in Asia so we are more connected to that part of the world and it is certainly a big change from the focus on Europe that we had a few decades ago.

The way we really grow in Australia has been by growing our existing cities, our existing population centres by expanding those. We need to make sure the investment is there in the cities because that is where the permanent arrivals are going to be, that’s where the students study and that is where the tourists go.

Largely, the skill VISA program is employing people who are working in fields that Australians aren’t working in or there is a shortage in. So it would be great to think that isn’t actually taking jobs away from those looking for jobs.

Australia will finish this year at 24 million, which is a new milestone. Next year, Sydney will hit 5 million. We know based on the current growth trends that we are going to hit about 40 million people by the middle of this century, and that is based on the current growth we are seeing. So that is a lot of new people that we need to house and again that we can make sure the quality of life is maintained for.

Watch Mark McCrindle address the topic on Weekend Today

The Royal Influence on Baby Names

Tuesday, May 05, 2015

The original category of celebrities – the royals – have not only captured the loyalty and affections of modern Australians but continue to significantly influence their choice in baby names.

Prince William’s popularity first placed William in the Top 10 in 2001 and the name’s popularity has grown significantly since then. In 2011, the year of the royal wedding, William became the most popular boy’s name Australia-wide and maintained this position until 2012 when Oliver took the top spot. While William is the 2nd most popular name overall, it is still the most popular boy’s name in the ACT, and the NT.

Princess Charlotte Elizabeth Diana; A Royal Influence

The birth of the Royal Princess in May (Charlotte Elizabeth Diana) will also contribute to the royal baby name trend. Like George’s rank, which increased from 71st in 2012 to 42nd in 2014, we are likely to see a resurgence of the name Charlotte, and see her regain first position in 2016. Because Olivia had only 123 more occurrences than Charlotte, it is likely that Charlotte will achieve the top spot next year, and maintain that top spot for a few years to come.

While Elizabeth is ranked 53rd on the Top 100 list, we can also expect that name to rise in prevalence. And Eliza (currently ranked 81st) may also see a rise due to the influence of the Royal Princess. Diana, a name which peaked in the 1940s and again in the 60’s is also due for a resurgence, and with the influence of the Royal Princess is likely to achieve it as well as an increase in rank in the years to come.

Prince George Alexander Louis; A Royal Influence

The birth of Prince George (George Alexander Louis) in July 2013 has positively impacted the use of George by Australian parents, increasing George’s rank from 71st in 2012 to 60th in 2013 and 42nd in 2014 – its highest ranking since the 1950s. Alexander’s popularity has also been impacted with an increase in rank from 15th to 9th in 2014.

Despite having only influenced parents for a period of less than 18 months to the end of the 2014 calendar year, the number of baby boys named George has dramatically increased, from 364 in 2012 to 640 in 2014.

Click here for the full Baby Names 2015 Report


Top Baby Names Australia 2015 Revealed

Monday, May 04, 2015

Around 1 in 10 Australian babies last year were given one of the Top 10 baby names; a total of 30,581 babies. There were 2,189 boys named Oliver and 1,796 girls named Olivia last year.

Oliver most popular in the States but William more popular in the Territories

Keeping the top spot from 2013 is Oliver, the top boy baby name in Australia for 2014 having overtaken Jack and William which were 1st in 2011 and 2012 respectively.

Oliver was the top boys’ name in all 6 states (NSW, VIC, QLD, SA, WA, TAS) while William was the top boy baby name in the 2 territories (NT, ACT).

There were 230 more instances of Oliver than William, an increase on the margin of 37 from 2013. In 2014, there were 2,189 boys named Oliver, 1,959 named William and 1,841 named Jack which is a decrease for both William and Jack on 2013.

Olivia Takes Top Spot after Charlotte’s 3 Year Reign

Olivia, with 1,796 occurrences is the top girl baby name in Australia for 2014, taking the top spot from Charlotte which is now in 2nd place. Charlotte was the most popular girls’ name from 2011-2013 but has now fallen behind by 123 occurrences.

Olivia was the most popular baby girls’ name in the three most populous states (NSW, VIC, QLD) while Charlotte was top in SA, TAS and NT with the names Emily and Amelia being the most popular in WA and the ACT respectively.

Shorter names win out

Jack (3rd) beats out Jackson (5th) just as it beats out John (93rd). Archie (34th) beats Archer (40th) and Max (16th) is more popular than Maxwell (97th). Even for girls currently Lily (11th) is more popular than Lillian (86th) and Ella (13th) outranks Isabella (14th) and Isabelle (22nd).

Place names

Place names are still a source of inspiration and while Australian places are rising the ranks, many (such as Bronte, Avalon, Brighton and Arcadia) are yet to enter the Top 100, and others like Adelaide are now out of the Top 100.

Indeed Maddison (16th) outranks Victoria (80th) and Georgia (31st) and Indiana (60th) are ahead of Eden (68th). For boys overseas locations still dominate with Jordan (54th), Austin (61st) and Phoenix (94th) outranking Australian locations (with the exception of Hunter, 21st).

A royal influence

The original category of celebrities – the royals – have not only captured the loyalty and affections of modern Australians but continue to significantly influence their choice in baby names.

Prince William’s popularity first placed William in the Top 10 in 2001 and the name’s popularity has grown significantly since then. In 2011, the year of the royal wedding, William became the most popular boy’s name Australia-wide and maintained this position until 2012 when Oliver took the top spot. While William is the 2nd most popular name overall, it is still the most popular boy’s name in the ACT, and the NT.

The birth of Prince George (George Alexander Louis) in July 2013 has positively impacted the use of George by Australian parents, increasing George’s rank from 71st in 2012 to 60th in 2013 and 42nd in 2014 – its highest ranking since the 1950s. Alexander’s popularity has also been impacted with an increase in rank from 15th to 9th in 2014.

Despite having only influenced parents for a period of less than 18 months to the end of the 2014 calendar year, the number of baby boys named George has dramatically increased, from 364 in 2012 to 640 in 2014.

Download Baby Names Australia 2015. Click here to download the full report.

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