Claire Madden Explains the Who, What and Why of Generation Z and Generation Alpha

Friday, April 17, 2015

The students of our world, at schools and universities are the children of Generation X, the cohort that follows Generation Y, and born from 1995 to 2009 they are Generation Z. And following them we have our Gen Alpha's born since 2010. These emerging generations have and are growing up in a time like no other we have seen before. They are the world's first truly global generations, constantly logged up and linked in. They are empowered by having access to every piece of information within a few clicks of a button, and here we find ourselves with the challenge of teaching and educating, of shaping, moulding and developing these emerging generations. Social researcher and demographer Claire Madden takes a look at these emerging generations, their defining characteristics and how we can better understand and engage them.

GENERATION Z

Those filling your schools today are labelled ‘Generation Z’ – born between 1995 and 2009, this generation currently make up 1 in 5 in our population. They make up just 1 in 10 in the workforce, but in a decades time they will make up over a quarter.

When they’re talking about a library they mean they’re playlist on iTunes. They speak and they write in a new language – if they can shorten it, they will. They are content creators, and their idea of an encyclopaedia is one that you can change and contribute to.

While they are constantly reading it’s rarely a book from cover to cover, and after all they are visual communicators, so why read it when you can watch it?

They speak another language like ‘totes’, ‘chron’ ‘chillax’ ‘epic’ ‘frothing’ fo shiz’ ‘cray cray’ ‘yolo’!

GEN ALPHA

And following our Gen Zeds we have Generation Alpha, the kindergarten and preschool children of today. Generation Alpha are likely to have just one sibling, and if they are a boy they’re likely to be called Oliver, William or Jack, and if a girl, Charlotte, Olivia or Ava.

Born since 2010, there are 2.5 million Gen Alphas born around the globe every single week. And the year that they were first born coincided with the launch of the iPad. In case you were wondering they have no idea what a broken record is, nor what you mean when you say they sound like one. They’ve probably never seen a camera that required film, and will probably never have to wait for their photos to be developed.

Glass was something we were told to not touch so it didn’t leave any grubby finger-marks, where as they are growing up with glass being something that they touch, swipe and interact with every single day. The only phones they’ve ever seen also take photos, record videos, access the internet, can download a million apps and have just one button, a fairway from the landline telephones that you could take off the hook. In fact now if you’re left without your mobile phone for a day, maybe you’ve left it at home or the battery’s died, the term is that you have been ‘land lined’.

Whilst Baby Boomers can remember the introduction of the colour TV in the 1970s, Gen Zeds and Gen Alphas can flick up a YouTube video from a smartphone onto the apple TV with ease. They are logged on and linked up, they’re digital natives, and they are the most materially endowed, technologically literate generation to ever grace the planet.

They are empowered by having access to every piece of information within a few clicks of a button and right there is where we find ourselves with the challenge of teaching and educating, of shaping, moulding and developing these emerging generations.

Find out more:

Claire Madden

Claire Madden is a social researcher and Director of Research at the internationally recognised McCrindle. Armed with her research methodologies, business acumen and communication skills, Claire effectively bridges the gap between the emerging generations and the business leaders and educators of today.

She is a next-gen expert, fluent in the social media, youth culture, and engagement styles of these global generations, and a professional in interpreting what this means for educators, managers and marketers.

With academic qualifications in communications and postgraduate studies in leadership, Claire brings robust, research-based content to her engaging presentations and consulting. As a social commentator, she has been interviewed on these topics on prominent television programs Sunrise and The Morning Show, as well as on the radio and in the print media.

To see Claire in the media click here.

Claire has delivered professional development sessions for school and tertiary teachers, given keynote addresses at conferences as well as board room strategy sessions. From conducting training days for corporate and not for profit clients, to addressing students, training rising leaders and facilitating youth panels, Claire is in a unique position to understand the emerging generations and communicate the key engagement strategies.

Some recent feedback about Claire:

“We received lots of positive feedback about Claire’s presentation on the day… it was great to have such an interactive and engaging presenter on board to present new and interesting content.” – The University of Adelaide

"Claire was excellent! She was warm in her presentation and full of useful information - it was very well received! ...It was exactly what we were after." – SU Queensland

“Claire’s ability to communicate the factual data in an engaging and interactive way was tremendous.” – Mentone Grammar

“We were extremely pleased with how both events went – Claire’s insights were highly valuable, as was the quality and professionalism of both her presentations” – Citi Bank Australia & New Zealand

Visit Claire’s website to find out more.

Download Claire’s updated speaking pack for more on her most requested topics, recent engagements and media exposure.

If you would like to inquire about having Claire at your next event, please contact ashley@mccrindle.com.au or our Sydney office on 02 8824 3422.

Q and A: Parenting Screenagers

Monday, April 13, 2015

Do we really need to be so worried about screen time and how do we understand and raise digital natives?


The launch of the iPad in 2010 coincided with the beginning of our current generation of children, Generation Alpha – and there are now 2.5 million Gen Alphas being born around the globe each week.

While Australian teenagers today consume more than 10 hours of screen time per day in around 8 hours of time – such is their multi-screening behavior – this is expected to increase for the generation of children born into a world of iPhones, YouTube and Instagram.

Children born in the last 10 years are moving through their formative years in a unique era – and a screen-saturated one. Also called the i-Gen, the click-n-go kids, Generation Connected and the digital integrators, technology is key to their lives and futures. In less than a decade, screens have become integral in their schooling, key to their social interactions and the primary channel for shopping and entertainment.

It’s a world of Screenagers where not only do they multi-screen and multi-task, but where glass has become the new medium for content dissemination and unlike the medium of paper, it is a kinaesthetic, visual, interactive, connective and portable format.

PARENTING SCREENAGERS

A key role of parents has always been to create a safe and supportive environment, and with children dedicating 27 per cent of their waking hours to screen time, parents today endure the added challenge of making their home not just physically secure but cyber safe as well.

And while there are added challenges for parents in watching out for screen addiction, cyberbullying and the management of child-friendly content, parents of Gen Alpha (Gen Y) are familiar with the online world and so are better equipped to manage these complexities. It is also important for parents to remember that the basic dynamics of parents and children are timeless. Therefore for 21st Century parents, the input of their own parents and the sage advice of grandparents has never been more important.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

More on effective parenting strategies can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.

PURCHASE IT HERE

Australia's Population Growth [In the Media]

Friday, April 10, 2015

Australia is currently the fastest growing developed nation on the planet and by the end of this year we will hit 24 million – twice as many people we had in 1968. For the last decade numerically we’ve had the most growth we’ve ever had and in the next 5 years we will add nearly 2 million people to our population as well as nearly a million households. We’re currently adding a new Adelaide to our population every 3 years! (more than a million people; 355,000 each year).

Click the image below to view social researcher Eliane Miles discuss the topic on Weekend Today

AUSTRALIA’S CAPITAL CITIES SEE THE MOST GROWTH

79% of our country’s population growth is happening across our capital cities. By next year Sydney will win the race to 5 million people, but Melbourne is currently the hotspot of all the capitals with the largest population growth, increasing by 95,700 people each year. Sitting at 4.4 million, Melbourne isn’t far behind Sydney and is on track to overtake Sydney as Australia’s largest city by 2056, when both cities will be home to more than 8 million people.

Yet the fastest growing capital is still Perth, growing at 2.5%, ahead of Darwin and Melbourne at 2.2%.

MIGRATION A POPULATION GROWTH CONTRIBUTER

58% of Australia’s growth comes from net overseas migration, which equates to 240,000 per year, and the remainder from natural increase. Nearly two fifths (38%) of all post 1950 immigrants have arrived since the year 2000, and three fifths (63%) of our migrants come on skilled visas – so there’s a steady stream of highly skilled and hard-working individuals looking to establish their families in Australia.

Victoria leads in terms of interstate migration, while Queensland’s population growth has slowed to its lowest rate in 15 years as has Western Australia – both states due to low net overseas migration over the last year.

THE IMPACTS OF A GROWING AUSTRALIA

With population growth comes increasing diversity, a rich lifestyle, greater entertainment options but also rising house prices, the wait for public services, and of course traffic congestion.

Our households will also look different - by 2020, for the first time in our history the couple only household will be more common than the couple with kids household. The solo person household will move from 23% to 27% by 2020 and will be fast closing in on traditional couple and couple with kids households.

The increase of 175,000 households to our population each year is set to continue over the next 5 years, and we’ll continue to see an increase in the demand for housing across our capital cities, particularly high density housing to accommodate smaller households.

The increase in housing density will mean that the vast expanse of the Australian outback will remain virtually as it is but the major cities will continue to expand, particularly upwards, with more people living in apartments than ever before.

Australia will become even bigger, denser, and more multicultural over the next 5 years. Some ‘Aussie Dreams’ may start to disappear such as the ‘quarter acre block’ and along with it the Hills Hoist garden shed and enough space for a game of backyard cricket. But no doubt new ‘Aussie Dreams’ will come to replace them – it is the Lucky Country after all!

#TuesdayTrend Highlights

Tuesday, April 07, 2015

#TUESDAYTREND


As Australia’s social researchers, we take the pulse of the nation. We research communities. We survey society. We analyse the trends. And we communicate the findings.

Every Tuesday we release a trend about Australia for #TuesdayTrend. Here are some of our recent #TuesdayTrends, highlighting fun facts about Australia. Be sure to follow, share and interact with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.


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Attitudes towards God and Church this Easter

Sunday, April 05, 2015

Each year Easter provides an opportunity for Australians to not just consume copious amounts of chocolate but also to reflect on the Christian meaning of this national holiday.

In the lead up to Easter we surveyed a nationally representative sample of 1,015 Australians to gage their attitudes and sentiments surrounding their belief in God and intentions to attend church this Easter.

Over half Australians believe God exists

Just over half (52%) of Australian’s believe that God exists as the creator of the universe and Supreme Being. These findings have yielded similar results to the same question asked to the Australian public 6 years ago (from the 2009 Survey of Australian Attitudes conducted by the Australian National University) in which 54% identified they have a belief in God.

Church attendance set to double at Easter

Whilst 15% of Australians regularly attend church (at least once a month, according to NCLS data), this is anticipated to double at Easter with around 1 in 3 Australians (30%) indicating they will attend church at Easter this year.

National Church Life Survey data shows that over the last four decades the proportion of Australians attending church at least once per month has more than halved from 36% (1972) to 15% currently. However this is still a significant proportion of the Australian population and indeed twice as many Australians attend church at least once per month (3.495m) as attend all AFL, NRL, A League and Super Rugby games combined per month (1.684m) during the football season.

Christianity still Australia’s largest religion

The number of Australians identifying with Christianity is more than 24 times larger than the numbers identifying with the second largest religion in Australia, Buddhism (2.5%). Indeed, the proportion of Australians identifying with Christianity as their religion is more than eight times larger than Australians identifying with all other religions combined (7.3%).


FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Mark McCrindle - Social Researcher

E: ashley@mccrindle.com.au

P: 02 8824 3422

Q and A: Fatherhood

Wednesday, April 01, 2015

Where is fatherhood going, and how far has it really come?


1 in 5 Australians are dads. There are approximately 4.6 million fathers in Australia, with an estimated 2.2 million of these have children aged under 18. The median age of a first-time dad today is 31, so today’s emerging generation of dads are Gen Yers and are parenting Generation Alpha, born since 2010.

Gen Alpha are the first generation of children to be shaped in an era of portable digital devices, and for many, the pacifiers have not been a rattle or set of keys but a smartphone or tablet device. A key role of fathers has always been to create a safe and supportive environment in which their children can thrive, and today this involves more than providing a physically secure home, but also a cybersafe one with 96% of households with children having internet access, and with Gen Alpha using personal digital devices at an ever younger age. However, Generation Y parents have been shaped in the digital world and so are better equipped to respond to new parenting challenges of managing cyberbullying, watching out for screen addiction, and ensuring child-friendly content. In the year that the oldest Gen Ys first became fathers in record numbers (2010), the iPad entered the market, “app” was the word of the year and Instagram was launched.

Our research has also found that Gen Y dads are not as competent or confident as their fathers were to change the oil in their car, repair a punctured bicycle tyre or fix a leaky tap, but in many ways, in an outsourcing era, they’re able to buy replacements or outsource those services. While they may have lost some of these traditional skills, they have picked up some new ones. Our research showed they are far more likely to be confident in changing a baby’s nappy, doing a grocery shop, buying clothes for their children and cooking a meal for their family.

Our analysis of Gen Y fathers has shown that they are parenting in ways that are responding to the changes relevant to these times and importantly, very relational with their children. This is important for this generation that was born in the 20th century, have entered parenthood in the 21st century and are shaping the first gen of children that will live into the 22nd century.


More on effective parenting strategies can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.

Purchase it here.

The Intergenerational Report

Monday, March 30, 2015

Earlier this month the Australian Government's Intergenerational Report was released, ‘outlining and assessing the long-term sustainability of current Government policies and how changes to Australia’s population size and age profile may impact on economic growth, workforce and public finances over the next 40 years’. (Aust Gov).

Social researchers and demographers Mark McCrindle and Claire Madden have given thought, analysis and media commentary on the report’s content, as well as implications this has for Australia moving forward.

Mark McCrindle on the Intergenerational report

Claire Madden on the Intergenerational report


1. Is increased immigration the answer to work participation shortages?

Currently, three fifths of our population increase is through migration with only two fifths from natural increase, so it’s already pretty high by historic levels. Also, migration doesn’t necessarily reduce the average age, since it is 37 for both an Australian and similarly a migrant coming in. So while increased migration meets the immediate workforce need, it will also add to the ageing population. Certainly it has been critical to Australia’s growth and will remain important into the future however it is just one part of the solution. The Intergenerational Report addresses the three P’s – population, productivity and participation. Participation refers to how the workforce can allow people to work later in life, as well as how workforce options and flexibility can build the participation of more young people and women. So apart from population factors, participation and productivity hold the key to future economic prosperity.

2. What jobs will help and pop up over time?

With the decline of manufacturing and the whole industrial base in Australia, there has always been talk of Australia moving to this knowledge economy and service jobs. I think from an older Australian perspective, if we do want to work through our 60s and 70s it is going to have to be in more technology-type roles rather than manual roles. But that’s part of the problem of the third P – productivity – we must ensure that we add the jobs to accommodate this and jobs that older people, students and others want to take up.

3. What does this mean for our cities?

Australia’s capital cities make up a significant proportion of Australia’s population. Because we are adding more than a million people every three years, we need to accommodate and plan for that – the infrastructure has to be there. People are not moving further and further out they are moving into the infill, into vertical communities. Infrastructure investment is critical to maintain the quality of life that Australians have come to expect.

4. Are intergenerational households set to increase?

Due to the increase in the cost of housing, we are going to see intergenerational households increase. Young people who can’t afford the $900,000 median house price in Sydney will be staying at home longer, as well as older Australians that don’t want to move into supported aged care, who will move back in with their families. So we are going to see a lot of change in household structures – where we are living and how we are living.

5. Will 2055 present a better experience of living in Sydney than today?

If you look at Sydney now it’s as good as it’s ever been. In fact the lifestyle is such that people are moving into the inner suburbs and we are seeing the renewal of areas that just a decade ago were not desirable. So I think we can find solutions. As this report says we do have to work, not harder – people don’t want to work longer or harder – but smarter. We’ve got to find some innovation skills and technology skills to solve the 21st century problems.

6. What challenges do Gen Y face in the wake of Australia’s Ageing Population?

It is certainly a challenge with the ageing population, the impact on government budgets, meeting the growing service demands, workforce shortages, leadership succession, wealth transfer and generational change. Keep in mind that the ageing of our population is a good news story. We are living longer, active later and able to work and contribute far more than any previous generation. But expectations will have to be managed. We have found in our research that some in Gen Y have a lifestyle expectation that they will be able to start their economic life in the manner which they have seen their parents finish theirs but such growth and gains are not always possible and should not be expected.

7. How does Gen Y’s situation differ from that of Gen X and the Baby Boomer generation?

The Baby Boomers certainly benefited from the post war boom, an increase in house worth and have had four decades of an economic boom. They’ve had stable economy and rising incomes over that time. And while we are at a point where the earnings have increased over the last couple of decades, wages have not kept up with the pace of house prices. So four decades ago the average earnings were $7600 in a year, while today it is around $72,000 so quite an increase, almost tenfold. But over that same period of time houses have increased by thirtyfold.

8. Considering the difficulty for Gen Y to become first home buyers, will we see a big preference shift among young Australians with regards to buying their first home?

The desire to buy a home is deep in the Aussie psyche, it’s the Aussie dream to have a place of your own but not necessarily a detached house with a backyard and a shed and a hills hoist. The Baby Boomers could pick up an average house in Sydney for $28,000 a couple of decades ago – now the average Sydney house price is over $850,000 so that is a dramatic change. Apart from the affordability challenge of such a home, there are changing lifestyles as well with new generations seeking not just a suburban life but an urban one, closer to public transport and more walkable communities. We are witnessing in Australia right now massive generational transitions.

A Snapshot of Career Practitioners in Australia

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Preparing young Australians for an ever-changing workforce is a growing challenge. Research released today by the Career Industry Council of Australia and McCrindle shows that over half of all career practitioners are working part time in their role. Of those, just 1 in 3 are able to devote the entirety of their time to career education and guidance.

Career practitioners increasingly under-resourced

What career professionals provide is key to getting young people into the workforce. When career practitioners are under resourced and time poor, this affects young Australians’ ability to enter the workforce.

Mark McCrindle, principal of McCrindle says, “Today’s school leavers are the most digitally supplied and globally connected generation in history but also have more post-school options to consider than any previous generation – they need help transitioning from education to participation. We know that school leavers today need life and career skills which can future-proof their employment in this changing, multi-career era and this is exactly what career practitioners provide.”


The top areas where career practitioners spend most or some of their time often involve things other than career counselling, such as subject selection:


Research shows 1 in 3 career practitioners are provided with less than $1000 annually to undertake career development activities across their entire school. 1 in 2 schools with a population of over 1000 students have less than $3 per student to spend on career education.


One in five unemployed Australians today is a teenager

These figures are especially of concern as 1 in 5 unemployed Australians today is a teenager.

290,000 young Australians aged 15 to 24 were categorised as unemployed in January 2015. The hardest hit were the 15 to 19 year olds, with the unemployment rate for this group hitting 20 per cent – a level not seen since the mid-1990s. Nearly 160,000 Australians aged 15 to 19 were unemployed in January, out of an overall pool of more than 780,000 unemployed.

“If we expect 15-19 year olds to be independent and resilient contributors to our society, it is important to provide them with quality career education programs whilst in school and give them access to high quality career advice, assisting them to make informed decisions about future study and work. This advice should come from qualified career advisers who meet the industry’s professional standards and have been registered by CICA,” says David Carney, CICA Executive Director.


Download the Infographic

Download the infographic which features the findings of a national survey conducted by CICA of 937 career practitioners working in schools across Australia.

For more information

For more information or media commentary, please contact Ashley McKenzie at McCrindle on 02 8824 3422 or ashley@mccrindle.com.au

Claire Madden on Physical Sport and Recreation

Thursday, March 19, 2015

Analysis of ABS data released last month shows that 2 in 5 (40%) Australians aged over 15 have not participated in any sport or physical recreation even once in the last 12 months – which increased from just over a third (35%) in the past year. With increased sedentary lifestyles among Australians today, social researcher and demographer Claire Madden sheds some light on what this means for the emerging generations and the challenge it presents to engage them in physical recreation not just virtual entertainment, and in face to face interaction not just screen-based communication.

Walking more popular than the gym

The most popular type of physical recreation Australians participate in is walking, indicated by 2.3 million females and 1.2 million males. This is followed closely by going to the gym or fitness, again more popular with females - almost 1.8 million females go to the gym with 1.4 million males doing the same. Males are more likely to go for a jog or run (740,500) than females (624,000).

The top 10 sports:


Whilst still popular, swimming and diving as a sport has dropped down the list in the most recent study, with an estimated 226,200 less people involved now than a year ago. Bushwalking has also lost participants, declining by 150,900 participants to a total of 285,600 being involved with the activity.

Aqua aerobics is rising up the list, growing from 75,300 participants to 90,800 in the past year along with triathlons which have become more popular, growing from 47,700 participants to 58,800 in the last year.

Younger generations most active:

Participation in sport and physical recreation was generally highest among younger generations. Almost three quarters of those aged 15-17 participated in sport (73.8%) which declines after finishing school to just over two-thirds of 18-24 year olds (67.2%). Just under half (46.6%) of Australians aged over 65 continue to participate in physical recreation and sport.

Sedentary lifestyles and the Screenage:

The sport participation rate has been declining across the board, and these younger generations are no exception, declining from a participation rate of 78 to 73.8 for Gen Zeds aged 15-17 in the last year.

In addition, Generation Z (born 1995-2009) have been born into the Screenage – where since 1997 we have spent more time on digital devices than in human face to face interaction.

Social researcher and demographer Claire Madden highlights that ‘the concern is the declining trend line of participation in physical recreation of Australians across age groups whilst at the same time an increasing trend of Australians likely to be obese or overweight, with current trend lines predicting that when Gen Z, born 1995-2009, reach adulthood in 2027, 78% of males and 62% of females in this generation are likely to be obese or overweight.’

Sedentary lifestyles are on the rise in this Screenage era, and based on a projection of the current trends, by the year 2027, when Gen Z have all reached adulthood, 77.9% of males and 61.8% of females are likely to be obese or overweight. ‘The concern is the declining trend line of participation in physical recreation of Australians across age groups whilst at the same time an increasing trend of Australians likely to be obese or overweight, with current trend lines predicting that when Gen Z, born 1995-2009, reach adulthood in 2027, 78% of males and 62% of females in this generation are likely to be obese or overweight’ Claire Madden said.

’ The challenge in our technological era is to engage these new generations in physical recreation not just virtual entertainment, in offline communities not just online networks, and face to face interaction not just screen-based communication.’ – Claire Madden

For more information:

For media commentary please contact Ashley McKenzie (ashley@mccrindle.com.au) on 02 8824 3422.

Discontent Brewing Among Australia's Social Media Users

Monday, March 16, 2015

Social media is a part of Australian life with 84% of Aussies now logging on to social networks. But concerns about personal privacy, cluttered newsfeeds and “meaningless posts” have brewed a hangover of over-connectedness with frustration towards social media platforms now rife. The findings were revealed in a national study on Australia’s attitudes to social media by research company McCrindle in partnership with Australian social media start-up Incogo.


Frustration and discontent with social media platforms

  • 90% of Australians express some level of frustration with having their personal information sold to advertisers and being flooded with too many advertisements on their news feed
  • 90% express some level of frustration over the confusion about their personal privacy and uncertainty about how to control their privacy
  • 78% express some level of frustration about the superficial way social media is used
  • And with more likes, posts, links and shares than ever before, 72% express some level of frustration with the proliferation of content clutter on their newsfeed/timeline

Aussies social media consumers rather than contributors

As a result of the above findings, Australians are increasingly unwilling to post much about themselves online, with 88% saying they post little or nothing of their real life on social media, but instead passively consume content others are creating.

Privacy concerns and lack of meaningful content plague most Australians


  • 97% of Australians expressed some level of importance on being able to protect their personal information from advertisers
  • 96% expressed some level of importance on the need for simpler privacy settings
  • 91% expressed some level of importance to content on their newsfeeds/timelines being more personally relevant to their lives
  • With social media creating an epidemic of over-connectedness, 83% of Aussies expressed some level of importance on the ability to have deeper connections with others online

Mark McCrindle, Principal of McCrindle says “Our research shows that although Australians are using social media in record numbers, there is a huge bubble of discontent brewing in this country. Australians are overwhelmingly frustrated with fears about their personal digital privacy and how social networks use their information as well as the lack of meaningful content on their newsfeeds/timelines. These frustrations are making people less comfortable to post to their social networks and causing the rise of a passive social media culture in Australia.”


Dan Millin, founder of new Melbourne-based social media start up Incogo says he commissioned McCrindle to conduct the research as part of his company’s strategy to better understand trends in social media. The findings supported the principles behind Incogo. “A few years ago, I started to question the value that existing social networks were bringing to my real life. I wanted somewhere more personal and private for my life where I could come together with others around the things I was doing or pursuing – just like I do in my real life.

For more information:

Daniel Millin – Founder of Incogo

daniel.millin@incogo.com


Mark McCrindle – Social Researcher at McCrindle

ashley@mccrindle.com.au (contact: Ashley McKenzie)

02 8824 3422

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