Mark McCrindle Speaking Pack Update

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Mark McCrindle is a social researcher with an international following. He is recognised as a leader in tracking emerging issues and researching social trends. As an award winning social researcher and an engaging public speaker, Mark has appeared across many television networks and other media. He is a best-selling author, an influential thought leader, TEDx speaker and Principal of McCrindle Research. His advisory, communications and research company, McCrindle, count among its clients more than 100 of Australia’s largest companies and leading international brands.

Mark’s highly valued research and reports, presented through infographics, data visualisations, videos, media input, resources, and blogs, have developed his regard as an expert demographer, futurist and social commentator.

Mark brings a fresh approach to his research based boardroom briefings, executive workshops, strategy sessions and keynotes. Armed with the latest findings and presented in a customised and innovative way, Mark is an in-demand communicator.

Mark McCrindle, BSc (Psychology), MA, is the author of three books on emerging trends and social change. The ABC of XYZ: Understanding the Global Generations, Word Up: A Lexicon and Guide to Communication in the 21st Century and The Power of Good.

Visit Mark's website to find out more

Download Mark's updated speaking pack, pictured below, or check out some case studies.

Older Australians Downsize

Thursday, March 06, 2014

2014 could be the year of the downsizing for older Australians. As property prices boom, older Australians are taking advantage of the market and selling their homes for something smaller, opting for a simpler life and a healthier bank balance.

It is predicted that tens of thousands of older Australians will sell this year. For many Baby Boomers and Builders, moving to a retirement village makes sense with neighbours in a similar life-stage and many everyday household tasks taken care of.

Others are choosing to stay in their family home for much longer periods of time.

“What we’ve got in Australia is not so much downsizing but down-ageing, so individuals are active later in life and happy to be in their empty-nest home much later than previous retirees were,” says social researcher Mark McCrindle.

Many of these new downsizers will want the best of both worlds – working and retiring all at once.

Mark confirms the trend among emerging retirees to downsize.

“Baby Boomers in their 60s have their main net worth tied up in their home, and they’re happy to sell to get more appropriate accommodation for themselves, so as the market rolls on, there’ll be a lot more selling and downsizing.”

Watch the latest segment of A Current Affair featuring social researcher Mark McCrindle:

Mark McCrindle on the Pulse of the Nation

Monday, February 24, 2014

Social Researcher Mark McCrindleSocial researcher Mark McCrindle:

It is imperative that we observe the shifts, respond to the trends, and so make the changes to remain relevant for our communities, our customers, and our organisations. 

The speed of change today, the scale of the trends, and the impact of the shifts have accelerated in recent times.

It's only occasionally in history that massive demographic change collides with rapid technological shifts and huge social trends, so much so that within the span of a decade society altogether alters. Today we are living amidst one such transformation.

We not only have new technologies in our pockets, but we have new words in our lexicons. 'Tweets', 'tablets', and the 'cloud' have changed their meaning in the last 5 years, and to 'share' or 'like' something now requires technology. 

Demographically we’re also fast-changing, with our population now sitting at 23.5 million and our national growth rate (1.8%) well above the world’s growth rate (1.0%). With a natural increase of 160,000 people per year (births minus deaths) and net overseas migration at 240,000 people per year (arrival minus departures), it is no doubt that we will continue to see an ever-growing, ever-changing, and ever-diverse cultural landscape.

Our households are changing,  with the nuclear family soon to be overtaken as Australia’s most common household (by couple-only households), and an increase in multi-generational households emerging. We’re an ageing society with a median age of 37.3 compared to 30.5 just a generation ago.

The way that we absorb, digest, and communicate information is changing in this post-structural, post-category, and post-linear era. Teachers, educators, HR professionals and trainers are needing to respond to changing learning styles, shorter attention spans, and the message saturation of today.

Our world is experiencing the biggest generational change since the birth of the post-war Baby Boomers. Increasingly Baby Boomers are downshifting, Generation Xers and Ys are the emerging managers, and the Gen Zeds are today’s new employees. The attitudes, values, and expectations of today’s workforce are changing through these generational shifts.

It is imperative that organisations respond to these changing times by rethinking the way they engage their customer communities, connect with their key stakeholders, and communicate their core message. Forecasts and strategic plans based on insightful research and customer segmentation is essential to help leaders understand the times.

-Mark McCrindle

Social researcher Mark McCrindle

Mark McCrindle is a social researcher with an international renown for tracking emerging issues, researching social trends and analysing market segments. His understanding of the key social trends and his engaging communication style places him on high demand in the media, at national conferences and in strategic boardroom briefings.

Mark is able to tailor his expertise, research, and analysis to suit your organisation’s specific needs. His latest topics include:

• Social networking, social media, social business: Emerging technologies, new strategies

• New consumers, diverse generations, emerging segments: Engaging with the ever changing customer

• Demographic shifts, social trends, future forecasts: Connecting with today’s communities

• Know the times, shape the trends: Engaging with key trends redefining our society

• Communication skills for the 21st century: Getting effective cut through in our message saturated society

• Leading teams in changing times: Motivating & leading teams in 21st century times

• Strategic trends forum: Strategic analysis of the external environment

To see examples of Mark’s recently delivered speaking sessions, click here, and contact us to check a date or enquire further about Mark’s presentations.

Skilled Migrant Increase: Aussies Too Posh for Menial Work [in the Media]

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Are Australians becoming too posh for their own good? A number of Australian industries are struggling to fill roles with local workers, resorting instead to a skilled migrant labour base.

Low skilled areas like meat manufacturing or fruit picking and growth areas like aged care and construction are industries in which many Australians are choosing not to work in. Instead, employers are increasingly looking to skilled overseas migrants to fill the gaps. 

The push from younger Australians towards more aspirational or professional roles is creating industries filled with many older Australian workers. Higher education is a popular option for young people, with 1 in 3 Australians in their late 20’s having a university degree. Today's Gen Y and Gen X employees are looking for career path and long term opportunities and, in most cases, are not satisfied with short term employment. 

Future planning is key with Australia leading most other OECD nations in population growth at 1.8% per year. Two thirds of Australia's population growth is from migration, with a further two thirds of this migration taking place through working visas. Long term planning in terms of public transport, hospitals and other infrastructure must be done in order for the country to adjust to the population growth caused by these migration patterns.

Mark McCrindle joins Natasha and James on Channel 10’s ‘Wake Up’ on the 14th of January to discuss the skilled migrant increase in Australia, the underlying causes leading to this population growth pattern, and what the government can do to ensure sustainability in the years ahead.

Aussies are Living Better than Ever [in the media]

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Australia is indeed the lucky country, but is life in Australia really getting better? The statistics say it is.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics’s Measures of Australia’s Progress report indicates that overall, Australia is doing better than ever when it comes to health, education, economic opportunities, and even political participation.

Over the last 10 years of time the average Australians' life expectancy has increased by 2 years. In fact, over the last 40 years of time our life expectancy has increased by 10 years. Two thirds of Australians now have a qualification after completing school, with one third of Australians having a university degree.

The economy is on a steady increase, even despite a recent global economic crisis. Cash flow is increasing with the net disposable income for everyday Australians now $10,000 more than it was a decade ago. 


Social researcher Mark McCrindle joins Nine’s Today Show to talk about the latest figures.


The Australian Communities Forum 2013 Event Recap

Monday, November 04, 2013

The Australian Communities Forum 2013, ‘From Generation to Generation,’ was a sold-out event featuring a packed line-up of engaging speakers and contributors.

Delegates were challenged, engaged, and inspired to move forward in their engagement with communities – whether local communities, staff communities, constituent communities, membership communities, customer communities, and special interest communities.

Sectors represented on the day included not-for-profits and charities, education and aged care providers, property and building organisations, financial institutions, and marketing and communications teams from a range of other industries and sectors.


“The event was fantastic! There was a broad range of topics covered, it was well-spaced and incredibly thought provoking.”


A Snapshot of the Forum


The morning began with a warm welcome from the City of Sydney Deputy Lord Mayor Robyn Kemmis, on the need to engage our local communities, followed by Mark McCrindle’s presentation, Australian Communities Defined: The Issues, the Challenges, and the Trends, featuring the Triple A’s of community engagement – awareness, affinity, and activity, and four trends facing Australian Communities.

Click here to access Mark’s presentation on Australian Communities Defined.

Andrew Duffin then engaged us with Placemaking: How to Create Engaging Community Spaces.


Following morning tea we were engaged by communications and creative consultant Greg Low through The Power of Story: How Your Organisation’s Story can be the Ultimate Engagement Tool.


Next-gen expert Claire Madden then developed the generational space with From Builders to Alphas: Meeting the Needs of Multigenerational Communities, followed by an urge to engage with our local communities, from community development expert Jon Owen in his session, Community Building: Enhancing the Capacity and Resilience of Communities.



“The event was very engaging and a great snapshot of Australian communities – there is a lot to reflect on and share with my team!”


After lunch, the Australian Communities Forum featured an ideas marketplace where experts were able to share useful skills and practical tips. Delegates participated in a number of 15 minute practical buzz groups to be equipped with practical insights:

  • ENGAGING: Developing advocacy to create activity and action [Alicia Crawford, Global Poverty Project]
  • INFLUENCING: Building a movement and changing a culture. [Jamie Moore, Hello Sunday Morning]
  • ADVERTISING: Getting basic cut-through by communicating the essence of who you are in 30 seconds. [Gavin Brett, Hope Media]
  • COMMUNICATING: Telling your story by capitalising on the essence, passion, and visio of your organisation. [Greg Low, R2L]
  • DESIGNING: Enhancing places and transforming spaces [James Ward, NBRS]
  • MARKETING: Digital Branding & Communicating through Social Media [Ainsley Freeman, Digerati Solutions]
  • STRUCTURING: The most common legal pitfalls and essential governance strategies for NFPs. [Luke Scandrett, Emil Ford Lawyers]


“Very interesting and high level information which was all new but could be incorporated into my work situation – I enjoyed the short and sharp presentations.”


The day was wrapped up with the Australian Communities Environmental Scan, featuring results from a future forecasting tool covering six key trend areas (Demographic, Economic, Social, Technological, Amenity, and Legislative Trends).

Click here to see Mark’s presentation on the Australian Communities Environmental Scan.

We also heard from CanToo’s founding director, Annie Crawford, on creating a culture of engagement through inclusiveness and turning the negatives into positives.

It was a wonderful, inspiring, and packed day! 

Thank you to the speakers and contributors who shared their thoughts and expertise. We wish you all the best in engaging with your communities!


“Excellent, insightful, and challenging event.”


Click here to see more photos from the event.

Bringing research data to life: Mark McCrindle at TEDxCanberra

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Mark McCrindle recently spoke at TEDxCanberra 2013. Here are some of his reflections on this landmark event:

Mark, you speak at a lot of conferences, what was it like to be invited to speak at a TEDx event?

Well it was a great honour. TED has an amazing brand and the production qualities and process associated with TEDx events are world class. It was amazing to be part of TEDxCanberra with poets, performers, thinkers and difference-makers – each of them leaders across a wide array of fields.

How did it differ from other conferences?

Being a TEDx event, the content, the ideas worth sharing had to be there, but more than this – the style was different to other corporate events. For a start you get a maximum of 18 minutes, not the standard 45 to 60 minutes for a keynote session. And there’s no lectern, which means no notes – which means knowing your talk well enough to get by without prompts!

What was the feel of the event?

An event with a producer and stage manager rather than a conference organiser is going to have a different feel. Additionally, the attendees are not there as corporate delegates but a diverse audience ready to be engaged, informed & entertained and so this creates quite a different dynamic.

From acrobats and artists to rehearsals pre-event and a party post-event, it was not the normal business conference, and it was a delight to be part of it.

What was the focus of your speech?

My theme was making research relevant through not just what methodologies are used but how we communicate the findings. In a world of big data we need visual data. In a world of information overload we need infographics. We don’t need more long reports as much as we need research we can see. When we see it, we are influenced by it and we act upon it. It’s how it always was – and how it still is!


Check out Mark's presentation or find out more about what McCrindle Research does in the world of research visualisation at researchvisualisation.com.

10+ Hours of Digital Media [Interview]

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

A recent McCrindle Research report, Australia: The Digital Media Nation, reveals that Australians are spending 10 hours and 19 minutes each day on digital media platforms. 

While over 10 hours of media consumption per day might seem like an incredibly long period of time, social researcher Mark McCrindle in this live radio interview, explains that it is not, in fact, almost an entire day.



Chronologically the time is in fact more like 7 hours, created by multiscreening behaviours. Australians might spend time on their smartphone while watching TV, or answer phone calls while browsing the internet.

Mark also explains that Australians don’t segment their time – that is why Australians have the ability to package such a large number of digital media hours each day. We don’t plan on setting aside 7 hours per day on digital media, but might use social networking at lunchtime or browse the web sporadically throughout the day. Timeshifting and multitasking are adding to our digital media hours of consumption.

Mark delves into the differences in findings across the generations from the McCrindle Research report. Older generations tend to prefer the TV, while the younger generations prefer online browsing via PCs and their smartphones.

While there are a number of benefits with the range of digital media channels available, Australians also seem to be addicted to digital media consumption – people can lose time for reflection and forward planning, and a hyper-drive pace of life can be created which can interfere with sleep and normal patterns of life.

Mark comments on the changing face of media including the fragmentation of digital mediums – while broadcast media has struggled as individuals move to new platforms, viewers are being empowered to interact with programs at a whole new level – tweeing while watching television or reposting news articles to social media platforms.


Listen to the full interview as Mark McCrindle discusses Australia’s digital media consumption on Brisbane’s 96.5 FM on 13 August 2013. 

Slanguage in Australia [MEDIA]

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

On the surface it looks like Australians all speak the same language, the Aussie brand of English. Yet historically we’ve come together from different colonies featuring unique histories which have affected our use of words regionally. To illustrate, while those in New South Wales might eat a devon sandwich for lunch, South Australians having the very same meal would be eating a fritz piece. This leads us to the following questions:

What is a nanger? Is hectic fully sick really a positive phrase? Are festy and feral the same thing? What about a stobie pole?

These questions answered plus more as Mark McCrindle joins Larry and Kylie on Channel 7’s morning show today, unraveling the regional use of language and thus helping us better understand ourselves as Australians.

Rise of Unemployment in Australia + Future-proofing your job [MEDIA]

Monday, July 15, 2013

Mark McCrindle joins the Daily Edition team on 11 July 2013 to unravel the best and worst industries to consider when looking for work. 

In June, Australia's unemployment rate rose to 5.7% (up 0.2% from May figures), with the number of unemployed people in Australia rising by 24,000. More companies are shifting full-time roles for part-time roles, and household budgets are increasingly getting tighter. In these times it is crucial for employees to identify future areas of growth and areas of job decline.

Jobs that are struggling include those that require a low skill base and those phased out by technology, especially as retail trade takes a hit on the sale of discretionary items. New jobs evolve as emerging sectors take off – in Australia, opportunities are being created by the latest baby boom, our ageing population, and the global opportunities presented by proximity to Asian markets.

Future-proofing your career comes through diversifying skills and upskilling, choosing multiple career options, and skilling in economic growth areas that will continue to thrive.

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