Top 10 Facts about Australians, Christianity and the Bible

Thursday, April 17, 2014
  1. Less than half of all Australians (45%) own a Bible
  2. Less than 1 in 3 Generation Y’s (32%) own a Bible
  3. Sydney is Australia’s Bible reading capital accessing the Bible online almost seven times as much as Darwin (2.67 page views per resident compared to 0.39)
  4. Richmond in Melbourne is the Nation’s leading Bible reading suburb with 3.86 online reads per resident in 2013
  5. Residents of Warrnambool, Victoria read the Bible online the longest (13 minutes 40 seconds per visit) with Gladstone, Queensland residents reading for the shortest period (4 minutes, 20 seconds per visit)
  6. “The Sermon on the Mount” (Matthew 6) is Australia’s most accessed Bible passage
  7. John 3:16 is Australia’s most accessed Bible verse
  8. Love, faith and joy are the most searched Bible keywords
  9. Online reading exceeds hard-copy reading. (Last year Australians accessed the Bible online (Biblegateway.com) almost 50 million times. If each of the Bibles Australian adults personally own were read even 6 times per year, there would still be more Bible reading conducted online.)
  10. Of all Australians who identified their religion as Christianity in the Census, only 3 in 4 own a Bible and only 1 in 4 attend a church at least once per month.

Download Bible Reading in Australia 2014. Click here to download the full report.

Australia's Top Baby Names 2014 Revealed

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

McCrindle Baby Names Australia 2014 ReportAustralia is setting new records in the number of babies born per year – 2013 saw over 315,000 births in Australia! Nearly two fifths (39%) of babies born in Australia each year are named one of Australia’s Top 100 baby girl or boy names – that’s 124,624 babies taking a Top 100 name!

What are the Top 100 baby names for boys and girls in Australia in 2013? Through the nation’s only comprehensive analysis of all the registered births across all eight states and territories, McCrindle reveals the Baby Names Australia 2014 report.

Oliver rises to the top as Charlotte continues her strong lead

Charlotte and Oliver Top Baby Names AustraliaFor the first time in Australia’s history, Oliver has become the nation’s most popular boy’s name, overtaking William who has been at the top of the ranks for the last several years.

While Oliver was the top boy's name in three states/territories (QLD, SA, TAS) and William topped the list in four states/territories (NSW, ACT, VIC, and NT), numerically there were 37 more occurrences of Oliver than William across the nation.

Charlotte continues to be the favoured name among girls, remaining strong in 1st place and the choice for 1,969 girls in Australia.

More babies, less convergence

More Babies, Less ConvergenceAs record births taking place in Australia, parents are being more original in the baby names they choose with fewer babies being given one of the Top 100 names and this naming originality is even more evident amongst the naming of girls than boys.

40.6% of babies born in the 2012 calendar year were named one of the Top 100 baby names, with this figure reducing to 39.6% for the 2013 calendar year.

Names are seeing a ‘Hundred-Year Return’ in Australia

Hundred-Year Return of NamesThe trend in baby-naming in Australia is for the traditional over the inventive. There is a ‘Hundred-Year Return’ theme taking place in Australia, with many of the top names of today also in the top names of a century ago, while names of a few decades ago have fallen out of favour.

There’s a ring to it, and boys feature less syllables

Sounds of Baby NamesThe trend towards short and solid-sounding names for boys and longer flowing names for girls continues strongly in Australia.

Most of the Top 100 boy's names have two or fewer syllables, while almost 2 in 5 of the top girl's name have 3 or more syllables – twice as many as for boys. Additionally, while most of the boy's names end in a consonant, most of the girls’ names end in a softer sounding vowel or Y sound.

The influence of the royals – 12 in 22 current royal names are top baby names

Influence of the Royals on Baby NamesThe original category of celebrities – the royals – have not only captured the interest of modern Australians but continue to significantly influence their choice in baby names.

The new generation of British royals with their traditional names yet celebrity power are influencing baby naming trends in Australia currently. William is the top boys’ name in four states and territories and has been Australia’s number 1 name since 2011. The naming of Prince George has already had an impact, raising the rank of this boys’ name to its highest level since the 1970s.

Access the Baby Names Australia 2014 report below for the latest trends in baby names, state by state analysis, the influence of celebrities on Australian baby names, and analysis of New Zealand baby names.

Download Baby Names Australia 2014. Click here to download the full report.


7 Trending Words of 2014

Thursday, March 20, 2014

New words often identify emerging trends and 2014 has already revealed some trending words. Here are our 7 Trending Words of 2014 which give an insight into the new segments, lifestyles and attitudes shaping our society.

Downageing

Australia’s longevity has hit new records with life expectancy at birth exceeding 80 years. But not only are Australians living longer, they are also working longer, active later and looking younger in lifestyle than previous generations at the same age. So meet the downagers: a generation of retirees who may be downsizing homes but not downsizing lifestyles.

Hobbypreneurs

This is where hobbies become entrepreneurial – turning interests into income earners. From yoga teaching to eBay selling to scrapbooking to personal training – many Australians are turning their passions into dollars. Australia has always been an entrepreneurial nation, and now people are turning their spare rooms and spare hours into home-based businesses that have lifestyle benefits and provide some earnings as well. In the last 4 decades the proportion of the workforce employed on a part-time basis has tripled from 1 in 10 workers in the early 1970’s to 1 in 3 today. Australians are using their extra time not just for work-life balance but in many cases are earning an income from the downtime – hence the rise of the hobbypreneur.

Silver surfers

Older Australians are online and on board the latest technologies just like their younger counterparts. Equipped with smartphones, tablets and apps, Australians aged over 65 may be retired, but their also wired – and increasingly wireless! These Google grandparents are the most tech-savvy seniors ever and are adept at Skyping their grandchildren, Facebooking the family and even doing a bit of Candy Crush on the side!

Screenagers

Australian teenagers consume more than 10 hours of screen time per day in around 8 hours of time – such is their multi-screening behaviour. While they share the teenage lifestage that is a rite of passage for every generation, they are moving through these formative years in a unique era – and a screen-saturated one. Also called the i-Gen, the click-n-go kids, Generation Connected and the digital integrators, technology is key to their lives and futures.

JOMO

In recent months FOMO (fear of missing out) has been given a counter reaction: for many it is JOMO (joy of missing out) that they experience. Knowing that you have avoided that conference dinner or work function and are comfortably ensconced on the lounge at home gives JOMO to many.

Showrooming

The use of a smart phone in a store to do online shopping, check prices, or to take photos of items to compare online is called showrooming. More than half of all Gen Ys have done some showrooming, highlighting how the divide between the online world and the real world is getting further blurred.

Landlined

If you have left your mobile at home for a day or run out of battery along the way – you know the feeling of being landlined! After the arrival of email, posted letters became “snail mail” and in this era of the ubiquity of mobiles, any tethered phone in this wireless world has the effect of landlining us.


For more of the latest trends on today's emerging language, see Mark McCrindle's book Word Up – a lexicon of 21st century youth slang, an overview of the factors shaping language, literacy, manners, and social interactions, and a guide to bridging communication gaps. For educators, employers, leaders and parents who rely on technology and spoken and written communications to influence and engage across the generations, Word up is an invaluable guide. Visit the McCrindle cart to purchase your copy today.   

Job Security in Australia: No longer ‘Job for Life’ or ‘Career for Life’

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Having a ‘job for life’ no longer exists. The workforce has been undergoing a massive transformation over the last three decades and currently the average Australian stays with their employer just 3 years and 4 months –
only a third of the way towards long service leave!

If this plays out in the lifetime of a school leaver today it means they will have 17 separate employers in their lifetime.

Moving jobs faster than ever before

Australians are used to moving on, either voluntary or unwilling – such as in the case of a company restructure and being let go of work. The big shift that we’re seeing, however, is that it’s now not just no ‘job for life’ but it’s also not even ‘career for life’ or ‘industry for life.’ We are not just changing employer but changing professions, industries, and retraining as we go. As such we are needing to retrain and upskill, preparing to move out of a given career trajectory to remain future-proofed.

The challenge of a less diversified economy

This is a proven challenge for many, especially those past a certain age or in a regional area where the employment sector is less diversified. The areas which currently have the highest unemployment, such as North Adelaide in South Australia or West Melbourne in Victoria, are also the areas where the number one industry by employment is manufacturing. In these areas there aren’t as many options, which creates extra challenges for those seeking work.

The states that have relied on just a few sectors or very large industries such as Victoria or South Australia are now feeling the sting of increasing unemployment. There’s a lesson here for Western Australia which needs to ensure that it has a broad enough employment base to ensure that any slow-down in mining doesn’t have significant ripple effects on the economy. New South Wales and Queensland have done well as they haven’t just relied on manufacturing or construction growth but diversified their economies through education, tourism, innovation, finance, property, IT, and scientific and technical services.

Looking outside the box towards growth opportunities

Certain industries in Australia are shifting, and Australians in declining industries should look to where the growth opportunities are.

The Top 5 industries 30 years ago were all industrial (mining, utilities, manufacturing, construction, and transport) whereas today there has been a shift to professional industries (Top 5 are mining, technical, IT, financial, and utilities).

While once derogatorily referred to as the world’s quarry, it turns out that we are the clever country after all with more people than ever employed in science and technical roles. The Australian workforce has undergone significant structural change and we’ve moved from an industrial base to a knowledge base.

Additionally, it’s a small business nation with 2.1 million businesses – that’s one business for every 11 Australians – and a large proportion of Australians employed in small businesses.

Workforce unemployment in the days to come

It is expected that Australia’s employment rate will continue to rise above where it currently sits at 6 percent in 2014, and economists are expecting it to peak in mid-2014. The rate has been on a steady increase and is currently the highest it’s been in 13 years, showing a very clear trend with the rise not slowing. There are clouds ahead and while we’re not in recession territory, this is a significant watch area, particularly when looking at sub-segments of employment across the youth sector and comparing state by state.

Click below to see Mark McCrindle's latest interview on Job Security on Channel Ten's Wake Up:

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Australia's Population Map and Generational Profile

Thursday, February 20, 2014

We are pleased to present our hot-off-the-press 2014 Population Map and Generational Profile!

Australia’s Population Map

Population MapThe population map is a handy resource that outlines Australian demographics – city by city, state by state. Australia’s eight capital cities are contextualised by population size amidst many of Australia’s other major cities, and population growth is analysed from state to state.

It takes just one handy glance to determine that while Tasmania’s population growth is just 0.1%, Western Australia leads the charge at 3.4%, compared the national average of 1.8%.

And while the ACT’s total fertility rate is just 1.79, slightly under the 1.9 national average, the Northern Territory’s is much higher at 2.21 births per woman.

The employment and population break-out boxes deliver insights of demographic and social change over the last 30 and 100 years. Australia’s workforce has grown by 2.8 million full-time and 2.4 million part-time workers since 1984, and unemployment rates have decreased by almost 3%.

Over the last century, Australia’s population has grown by 18.5 million people. Our national growth rate is well above the world’s average at 1.0%, caused by a steady growth in annual births and net overseas migration.

Australia’s Generational Profile

Generational ProfileThe generational profile delivers a concise snapshot of Australia’s generations by their years of birth, population size, percentage make-up of the workforce, and education levels.

While the Baby Boomers currently make up over a third (34%) of the total workforce, by 2020 they will comprise of less than 1 in 5 workers. Australia’s workforce is increasingly made up of Generation Y (which will grow from 21% today to 35% in 2020) and Generation Z (comprising just 2% of workers today but rising to 12% in 2020).

Visit our online cart to order the double side printed 420gsm gloss artboard, A5-sized infographic for your desk, your next event, or your clients! You can also download the free digital version here

Australia's Population Map

Australia's Generational Profile

Man Drought

Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Man Drought McCrindle

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The so-called “man drought” is an expression that has been used to describe the demographic reality in Australia of the population of women exceeding that of men. In Australia there are almost 100,000 more women than men, with 6 out of our 8 states and territories experiencing a man drought, while the Northern Territory and Western Australia have a significant male surplus. Currently there are almost 105 baby boys born for every 100 baby girls and so while there are more male than female children and teenagers in Australia, the gender gap dissipates in the twenties and by age 35, there are more females than males.

The regions in Australia with no “man drought” are those with significant mining operations (particularly Western Australia) and large military bases (most notable in the Northern Territory). In the NT there are almost 111 males for every 100 females, and WA has 102 males for every 100 females, with 27,389 more men than women in the state.

Victoria is the state with the highest ratio with females to males (98 males to every 100 females), with 58,399 more women than men. In Victoria there are no population centres not currently experiencing a man drought. However, suburb by suburb reveals gender disparities. Footscray has a man surplus (13% more males than females), whereas a few suburbs away in South Melbourne, the man drought is very evident with 5% more females than males.


NSW: Singleton is living up to its name with not only almost 5% more males than females, but with a median age of just 33 (well below the national average age of 38), many of these males are indeed single. Interestingly, just 90 minutes south is Wyong, where there are almost 7% females than males (almost 5,000).

Sydney makes for a fascinating study in populations by gender, with Pyrmont having 3.6% more males than females whereas the next suburb over the Anzac bridge lies Balmain with 8.7% more females than males.


QLD: While Queensland is suffering a man drought at an overall state level, the drought has more than broken in many of its inland cities, particularly where there are mining activities and Mt Isa is a classic example with almost 12% more males than females (an oversupply of 1137 men). However 1,000kms north east is Cairns with a man drought (1537 more women than men).

In Brisbane, the river represents a man drought divide with Yeronga experiencing the man drought (almost 5% more women than men), while Spring Hill has a man over supply (a whopping 27% more men than women).


SA: In South Australia, Whyalla is home to one of the state’s few places not experiencing a man drought with 241 more men than women. While West Lakes (along with most suburbs in Adelaide), is in man drought with almost 8% more women than men.


WA: Many of WA’s towns have no man drought – Kalgoolie a leading example with almost 10% more men than women, while Bunbury, south of Perth, like many of WA’s costal towns has more women than men (1.3%).

In Perth, Midland has 2% more men than women but just half an hour to the west lies Stirling with 1561 more women than men (almost 3%).


TAS: Every city and town in Tasmania is experiencing man drought – however Central Hobart has more men than women (1%), but just 2km west is West Hobart which has 9% more women than men.


ACT: And in the National Capital, Commonwealth Avenue acts as a man drought conduit with South Canberra experiencing man drought (530 more women than men), but on the other side of Commonwealth Ave bridge in North Canberra, there are 592 more men than women. 

How do Australians get to work? [in the media]

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Mark McCrindleAustralia is growing by 300,000 cars each year and is currently home to 13.3 million registered passenger vehicles – an all-time record high.

Social researcher Mark McCrindle joins ABC’s News Breakfast to talk through the latest social analysis on transport and how Australians get to work.


9 in 10 Australians use a car for some purpose, and 7 in 10 Australians use a car to get to work. Just 1 in 10 Australians use some form of public transport to get to work.

When asked why Australians don’t use public transport, 54% say it’s because public transport options are not readily available to them. In fact, for 1 in 5 that do use public transport, they also use a car to access their bus or train stop.

These figures explain why Australians place such an emphasis on government tax dollars being spent on improving road systems rather than investing in public transport infrastructure.

The urban sprawl that has marked our cities is evident in these figures. Tune in to the segment as Mark discusses the latest social analysis:



ABC News Breakfast also takes an in-depth look at McCrindle's Getting to Work figures across the nation's capitals.

When comparing cities and regions, Sydney has 1.1 million drivers on the road, and while Melbourne has less commuters, it actually has more car drivers than Sydney.

Almost 40% of all female cyclists get to work in Melbourne.

Sydney has declined in the number of people taking passengers to work, whereas Hobart leads the charge with people dropping someone to work.

The Northern Territory is the place where people are more likely to walk to work than any other state or territory with 1 in 10 walking to work.

Queenslanders are most likely to use a motorcycle than any other city, and Canberra is also big in push bike riding.

Tune in to ABC reporters as they discuss how Sydney and Melbourne commuters compare in the way they get to work:



Australia Then and Now: 30 Years of Change

Saturday, January 25, 2014
Australia Then and Now McCrindle

Click here to download the infographic.


Australia is a nation in transition. In the span of a generation, Australia’s population has increased by more than half. Demographically we are ageing, with an average age 7 years older than it was 3 decades ago, but with a life expectancy 7 years greater than it was in 1984.

Our growing population is being achieved not only through this increased longevity, but also through record births- more than 300,000 per year. This is more than 25% higher than the peak of the original post-war baby boom. Yet as significant as this natural increase is, the largest source of our population grow immigration, with significant shifts in the Top 5 countries of birth. In 1984, the Top 5 countries of arrival were all European (and New Zealand) while today both China and India are in the Top 5 with Vietnam and the Philippines not far behind.

While the population has increased by 51% since 1984, the workforce has increased by 81%. Three decades ago the average full time worker took home just under $19,000 per year in a time when the average house price was less than $150,000. Today annual earnings exceed $73,000 with the average house price in most capital cities exceeding $520,000. From an employment perspective, the Australian workforce has transitioned from industrial in 1984 to professional today. The largest industries by workforce were all industrial in 1984 while today professional, scientific, technical, IT and the financial sectors make up the biggest employers along with mining and utilities.

In 1984 almost 2 in 3 Australians were married while today less than half are. And the “never married” proportion has increased from 1 in 4 to 1 in 3. From a religious perspective, Christianity is still the religion of more than 3 in 5 Australians, down from 3 in 4 in 1984. Meanwhile the “no religion” proportion has doubled and the “religion other than Christianity” numbers have increased from 265,600 to 1.68 million today.

In addition to these demographic changes, the shifts in our national identity are significant. Certainly the old affections run deep however there is a recognition of Australia as a cultural hub, a technology exporter, a fashion destination, a small business nation and a nation hosting iconic events.

It seems that Australians are comfortable in their own skin- embracing of this sunburnt country with all its iconic landmarks, yet proud of the cultural achievements and our diverse cities. There’s an understated confidence that welcomes the world to this unique landscape, yet has the posture to proudly list off our cultural achievements.

There is a depth to our reflections on 21st Century Australia. The iconic language and Australiana is retained and reinterpreted with a new sophistication, and without the cringe. Our cultural identity is also being interpreted beyond the beach or sport. Multiculturalism has come of age in Australia. You can tell because there is little self consciousness and even less tokenism expressed. Rather the cultural mix is in our national DNA, it’s part of our lifestyle- it’s who we are. The fact that more than 1 in 4 of us weren’t born here seems unremarkable- as though it has always been thus. Many comments celebrated the richness of our lifestyle that comes through the input of so many cultures.

Amidst massive national and global change, the Aussie spirit is alive and growing in the 21st Century. What it means to be Australian has morphed to meet the challenges and diversity of our changing times. Australians hold strongly to an identity and “Aussie values” yet these are more sophisticated and mature, and represent our place in a world of global interactions.

Jobs of the Future: Where will we be working in 2030? [in the media]

Thursday, January 23, 2014

The jobs of today will not be the jobs of tomorrow. It is not just young people who are affected by economic shifts as they consider their area of study, but all working Australians will experience the demographic shifts and technological trends taking place over the coming decades.

To future-proof careers, looking at the big picture trends to define future growth areas is essential.

Technological influences are creating massive jobs and opportunities, bringing other jobs to an end. From manufacturing becoming automated, robotic processes replacing jobs, driverless vehicles and the emergence of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) replacing human navigation, and automated pickers reducing the demand for some plant operators, new technologies are replacing old roles. However, technology also creates new careers and opportunities. For example, in less than a decade, cloud computing, social media, and wireless devices have created roles such as teleworking coordinators, app developers, social media managers, and digital analysts.

Demographic changes such as Australia’s ageing population is creating new demand and opportunities, not just for the aged care sector but also for retirement service agents. Australia’s record birth rates and more affluent parents are creating new childcare services and carer roles. From cultural diversity to changing family structures, population shifts create new demands and industries.

Today’s average school leavers will have 17 employers in 5 industry sector across their lifetime. Traditionally, even a generation ago, people stayed 10 years in a career, but today’s average work tenure is just 3 years and 4 months per job.

Mark McCrindle joins Tarsh and James live from Manly beach on Network Ten Wake Up. Mark describes that the key for tomorrow’s employee is being innovative, not thinking in terms of a ‘career-for-life,’ but pursuing a broad range of easily-adaptable skills.

“Being nimble is key,” Mark says, “As all of us will be living longer and working later than ever before.”


Generation Z Commence University: Choosing the Right Course

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

2.1 million Australians (9% of the total population) are enrolled in formal study beyond the school classroom and 7.8 million Australians aged 25-64 have a post-secondary qualification which is 2 in 3 people (67%, up from 54% a decade ago).

2014 marks the first year of Generation Z, those born since 1995, entering university. They are the most digitally supplied, globally connected, and formally educated generation in history. They not only have more institutions to consider – from traditional universities to private colleges, but more ways to study – from on-campus to online, and more course options than ever before.

As these Gen Zs begin their university studies and many of Australia’s Gen Ys seek to further their current qualifications, McCrindle Research analyses ABS and Graduate Careers Australia data to compile lists of the best degrees.


Graduate earnings hit an all-time low in real terms


Three decades ago, the average graduate’s starting salary was the same as average full-time weekly earnings (average male full-time earnings). Therefore, when the Baby Boomers graduates were commencing their employment, the average 21 year-old bachelor-level graduates began their earning years on a salary equivalent the average full-time earner.

Graduate starting salaries have continued to lose ground against average weekly earnings and are now just over 77% of this benchmark.

Additionally, the variation in starting salaries across courses is massive, ranging from more than $64,000 (engineering) to $39,000 (pharmacy), while the average starting salary for a construction worker is $40,000 and for a factory worker is $42,000.


But degrees offer good earnings growth


The difference in starting salaries between those who enter the workforce without tertiary qualifications and those with a bachelor degree is negligible, but the motivating factor to pursue higher education remains. A senior salary for a factory worker is $63,000, for a construction worker it is $75,000, for a pharmacist it is $80,500, and for an engineer, $173,000.


Generation debt


There are more graduates than ever and at the same time more study debt than ever. The average HELP/HECS debt has increased from $10,600 in 2006 to $15,200 in 2012. There are currently almost 1.7 million Australians with a HECS debt, and the most common HECS debt owed (by more than a quarter of million HECS-debtors) is between $20,000 and $30,000. The total study debt owed to the Commonwealth is approach $30 billion, with most of this owed by Generation Y. It is estimated that up to 20% of this will never be repaid.

Generation Z will run up more study debt than any other generation in history. The challenge, as this analysis reveals, is that the majority of graduates in some of these course areas will accumulate a significant debt for a degree in a field in which they will never work. The mixed blessing for graduates in some of these courses is that they will not have to pay off their study debt for some time as the average starting salary is well below the current HECS-HELP repayment threshold of $51,309.


More graduates, less work


For the Builders generation (those aged in their late 60s), just 1 in 10 have a university degree. For the Baby Boomers (those in their 50s) this is 1 in 5, for Generation X (those in their 30s) it is 1 in 4, and for today’s Generation Ys (in their late 20s) 1 in 3 hold a tertiary qualification. Based on current trends for today’s school aged students, Generation Z, as many as 1 in 2 will likely end up with a university degree.

Yet while the proportions of Australians with university degrees continue to rise, the number of bachelor degree graduates who are able to secure work within 4 months of graduating is significantly decreasing, with 71% of bachelor-degree graduates able to secure full-time employment in 2013 compared to 76.1% in 2012 and 76.3% in 2011.

At the same time, the percentage of graduates in part-time or casual employment and looking for full-time work is increasing (18.1% in 2013 compared to 15.3% in 2012 and 14.9% in 2011), as is the percentage of students not working but looking for full-time employment (10.6% in 2013 up from 8.6% in 2012 and 8.7% in 2011).


Emerging careers


In order for today’s school leavers to combat the unprecedented choices they have in studying, they need to look to Australia’s economic, demographic, and technology future to make informed choices. Many Australians are employed in jobs today that didn’t exist a decade ago, and of the estimated 17 jobs that Gen Z will hold in their lifetime, some of these don’t currently exist.

In McCrindle Research’s national study, when Australians were asked to nominate which courses of study they felt will emerge over the next decade to accommodate growth areas and emerging careers, respondents focused predominantly on the digital age and health care.

Careers in information technology, computing science, digital media, online education, digital communication, and any other skills requiring computer technologies were seen to be on the rise, as were careers focusing on health and medicine, particularly in the provision of aged care health services. Australians also felt that the field of environmental science and research into renewable energies and resources would continue to increase in the decade ahead.


Top 4 ‘Future-Proofed’ Degrees


These degrees are often underrated and overlooked, yet turn out to offer the best graduate employment opportunities. More than 4 in 5 (80%) graduates from bachelor level study were available for full-time employment, and the vast majority of these were working in their field of study. Additionally, each of these top four courses delivered a salary above the national $50,000 graduate average.

Rank

Name of Course

Available for Full-time employment

Of those in full-time employment, % working in their field of study

Median starting salary

1.

Surveying

85%

90%

$52,000

2.

Urban/Regional Planning

81%

81%

$50,000

3.

Rehabilitation

80%

89%

$50,200

4.

Electrical Engineering

80%

76%

$60,000

Table 1: ‘Future-Proofed’ Degrees

Social researcher Mark McCrindle comments on Australia’s most underrated degrees, stating: “Australia’s population growth is creating the need for more homes than ever and the redevelopment of many existing urban centres. This planning and construction boom is creating great opportunities for graduates in relevant fields and has facilitated surveying, urban planning, and engineering to be rated in the Top 4 courses based on a combination of employment, earnings and analysis”.

“Additionally,” McCrindle says, “Australia’s ageing population is creating growth and opportunities in courses in the rehabilitation and health fields”.


Top 4 ‘Populist’ Degrees


These Top 4 “Populist” Degrees are those that are impacted by their own success. When the supply of undergraduates exceeds the demand on the employment side, many graduates end up either moving to further study rather than employment, working in a career in a different field to their course or commencing on salaries below the average graduate starting salary.

One of the most popular university subjects is Psychology (currently ranked 6th most popular in the world by Topuniversities.com) and in Australia it is also one of the most popular courses. The data below shows that only 40% of Psychology graduates are “career-ready” (available for full-time employment), and of graduates who are currently in full-time employment, only 63% are working in the field of psychology. In addition, those who are working full-time in their field start off with a median salary of $47,500, well below the average starting salary of $50,000.

Of all visual and performing arts graduates, just half of those employed are working in their field of study, and architecture offered one of the lowest graduate starting salaries.

Based on the above criteria (the percentage of graduates available for full-time employment, their employability in their field of study, and their median salary), here are the degrees which most fit this criteria:

Rank

Name of Course

Available for Full-time employment

Of those in full-time employment, % working in their field of study

Median starting salary

1.

Psychology

40%

63%

$47,500

2.

Architecture

42%

72%

$32,500

3.

Visual and Performing Arts

47%

52%

$38,000

4.

Social Sciences

49%

60%

$45,000

Table 2: Most ‘Populist’ Degrees

“Along with arts, law, and the social sciences, psychology has become a ‘generalist’ degree rather than an avenue to professional practice and the figures need to be seen in this light,” says Mark McCrindle.

“As a psychology graduate not working as a psychologist, I can understand the interest in the field and despite the statistics above, I know first-hand its benefits as a foundational degree,” he states.


Click here to download this social analysis:

Click here to download this file


Sources: McCrindle Research, Graduate Careers Australia, ABS Measures of Australia’s Progress, DEEWR Higher Education Reports, DIISRTE, Open Universities Australia.

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