Q and A: Couple and Nuclear Families

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Are couples set to overtake nuclear families as the most common household in Australia, and if so, why?

For the first time in Australia's history, the nuclear family (couple with children) will no longer be the most common household – while today they make up 33% of all households, within a few years the couple only household will be the most common type of household.

There are a number of factors influencing this transition, including Generation Y couples having children later, and Baby Boomer households becoming empty nesters in record numbers.

Today the median age of parents is three years older than in 1984. The median age of mothers and fathers at new births is now 30.7 and 33 respectively. The increasing of the median age at new births means that households are remaining couple only for longer.

Besides couple only households, other household types are becoming more prevalent. Multi-generational households are on the increase with Baby Boomers being sandwiched between taking care of their parents (the builders) and their children (Gen Y) who are either studying whilst living at home or choosing to stay or return home after moving out, to combat the increasing costs of living out of home.

In addition to multi-generational homes, single person households are also on the increase and such is the impact of the ageing population that by 2036, solo person households will also be more numerous than nuclear families.

Additionally, the century-long trend of declining household size is set to continue. In 1911 there was 3.5 people per household while today there is an average of 2.6 people per household. However within a decade this will have dropped again to an average of 2.5 people. So Australian households and the generations that comprise them are very different today to those of the 20th Century.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

More on changing household structures can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.


Highlights from #TuesdayTrend

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

#TuesdayTrend

As Australia’s social researchers, we take the pulse of the nation. We research communities. We survey society. We analyse the trends. And we communicate the findings.

Every Tuesday we release a trend about Australia for #TuesdayTrend. Here are some of our recent #TuesdayTrends, highlighting fun facts about Australia. Be sure to follow, share and interact with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.



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In a world of big data- we’re for visual data. We believe in the democratisation of information- that research should be accessible to everyone not just to the stats junkies. We’re passionate about turning tables into visuals, data into videos and reports into presentations. As researchers, we understand the methods but we’re also designers and we know what will communicate, and how to best engage. We’re in the business of making you look good and your data make sense.


For more information, please get in touch – we’d love to hear from you:

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Q and A: The Sandwich Generation

Thursday, May 14, 2015

What is the ‘triple decker sandwich’ Baby Boomers are facing and what are the solutions?

Social and demographic changes, including the rising cost of living and house prices has led to changes in family configurations and living arrangements. The children of Baby Boomers, Generation Y, have significantly delayed the life marker of marriage, with the median age of first marriage now at 29.9 for a male and 28.3 for a female, as well as childbirth, with the median age of parents now 33 for a male and 30.8 for a female.

They are also delaying other lifemarkers of leaving home, starting their career and obtaining a mortgage more than ever before, and for the first time an entire generation of parents are entering their 60s while still providing financial and personal support to their children. Whilst the “couple with kids” household remains the most common household type in Australia, making up a third of Australia’s 9.1 million households, household structures are changing with a noticeable rise of the multi-generational household.

Generation Y have also been labelled the Boomerang Kids, as once they leave their family home, they often boomeranging back again, sometimes with a few kids in tow. Many Baby Boomers are not therefore downsizing the family home, but creating space for their adult children and grandchildren to live under the one roof. This type of arrangement is a significant financial advantage for Gen Y KIPPERS (Kids In Parents’ Pockets Eroding Retirement Savings) who may be saving $15,000 per year on rent alone by living with their parents. For mum and dad, however, retirement plans are delayed and retirement savings significantly decrease.

In addition to this, many of today’s Baby Boomers have an additional caring role of supporting their ageing parents, ‘sandwiching’ them between their adult children (and grandchildren) as well as their parents’ generation who are living longer – which is why they have been labeled the triple decker sandwich generation.

THE SOLUTIONS:
  1. Multigenerational households can provide great support networks for raising the next generations, but so that the pressure doesn’t fall unequally on the shoulders of one generation, have a plan to share the load of household jobs and responsibilities.
  2. Plan ahead for aged care options so the best care can be provided at each stage.
  3. Separate living spaces in the one house can provide opportunity for each generation to have their independence and space whilst still having shared time together.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

More on generational characteristics and transitioing can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.

McCrindle in the media

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

As Australia’s leading social researchers, the senior research team at McCrindle are actively involved in media commentary. From demographic analysis and future forecasts, to communication of key research findings and the identification of social trends, at McCrindle we are passionate about communicating insights in clear, accessible and useable ways.

We assist our clients in identifying newsworthy media angles in their research to assist them in communicating the insights effectively with the broader public.

Here are some of our recent media appearances:

McCrindle in the Media

A record 5 million Visas will be issued in 2015. The 5 million short term arrivals is great news for anyone in the tourism and education sector. But with this increase in population we need to make sure the investment is there in the cities as that's where the permanent arrivals are going to be, that is where the students are going to study and that's where the tourists are going to go.


Click here to watch Mark McCrindle address the topic on Weekend Today.

Australia is currently the fastest growing developed nation on the planet and by the end of this year we will hit 24 million – twice as many people we had in 1968. For the last decade numerically we’ve had the most growth we’ve ever had and in the next 5 years we will add nearly 2 million people to our population as well as nearly a million households. We’re currently adding a new Adelaide to our population every 3 years! (more than a million people; 355,000 each year).

Click here to watch social researcher Eliane Miles discuss the topic on Weekend Today.


What does the Australia of today really look like? With the typical length of employment being 3.3 years and Australians today working on average 17 jobs in their lifetime, we are seeing a shift from job stability to job flexibility. The rise of the couple only household means the nuclear family is on the decline. Because kids are staying at home longer, they've been named the KIPPERS (Kids in Parents Pockets Eroding Retirement Savings). And in the midst of the current baby boom, Australian's are having children later in life.

Click here to watch Research director Claire Madden give insight into these trends.



Forget the name Jack, now it's all about Jaaxxon. The McCrindle boys' list shows how times are changing. Although the same boring old names like Jack and Tom are right up the top, there's a spate of new names like Jayden (38), Tyler (41), Chase (56), Kai (58) and Braxton (77).

Click here to read the full article.




Most members of Generation Y are 'fiscally conservative' and have more money than debt, a new study has found. Generation Y were particularly vulnerable to current economic challenges and these had exacerbated existing inequalities, demographer Mark McCrindle of McCrindle Research said. "Generation Y are the new householders; they're emerging into their careers, they're right in the wealth accumulation life stage . . . so what's happened in the last decade has really hit them hard," he said.

Click here to read the full article.



Australia was a very different place 100 years ago. In 1915, you could buy a block of land for 200 pounds and milk was three pence per litre. Social research company McCrindle dug into the Australian Bureau of Statistics archives to see just how far we’ve come on the eve of the ANZAC Centenary.

Click here to read the full article.


Population Boom [in the media]

Thursday, May 07, 2015

This year a record 5 million VISA’s will be issued to foreign students, tourists and workers, with many of them choosing to call Australia home for good. The unprecedented boom is being likened to the influx that Australia experienced in the aftermath of WWII.

The 5 million short term arrivals are great news for anyone in the tourist and education sector. These sectors are two of our biggest export earners, they keep the economy going so to have more tourists and more students here is fantastic.

Adding an extra 2 million people, even short term is significant.

If you look at just permanent arrivals coming in to Australia and staying for 12 months or more, we are talking about the equivalent population of a new Gold Coast every 15 months.

6 of the Top 10 countries of permanent arrivals are in Asia so we are more connected to that part of the world and it is certainly a big change from the focus on Europe that we had a few decades ago.

The way we really grow in Australia has been by growing our existing cities, our existing population centres by expanding those. We need to make sure the investment is there in the cities because that is where the permanent arrivals are going to be, that’s where the students study and that is where the tourists go.

Largely, the skill VISA program is employing people who are working in fields that Australians aren’t working in or there is a shortage in. So it would be great to think that isn’t actually taking jobs away from those looking for jobs.

Australia will finish this year at 24 million, which is a new milestone. Next year, Sydney will hit 5 million. We know based on the current growth trends that we are going to hit about 40 million people by the middle of this century, and that is based on the current growth we are seeing. So that is a lot of new people that we need to house and again that we can make sure the quality of life is maintained for.

Watch Mark McCrindle address the topic on Weekend Today

Top Baby Names Australia 2015 Revealed

Monday, May 04, 2015

Around 1 in 10 Australian babies last year were given one of the Top 10 baby names; a total of 30,581 babies. There were 2,189 boys named Oliver and 1,796 girls named Olivia last year.

Oliver most popular in the States but William more popular in the Territories

Keeping the top spot from 2013 is Oliver, the top boy baby name in Australia for 2014 having overtaken Jack and William which were 1st in 2011 and 2012 respectively.

Oliver was the top boys’ name in all 6 states (NSW, VIC, QLD, SA, WA, TAS) while William was the top boy baby name in the 2 territories (NT, ACT).

There were 230 more instances of Oliver than William, an increase on the margin of 37 from 2013. In 2014, there were 2,189 boys named Oliver, 1,959 named William and 1,841 named Jack which is a decrease for both William and Jack on 2013.

Olivia Takes Top Spot after Charlotte’s 3 Year Reign

Olivia, with 1,796 occurrences is the top girl baby name in Australia for 2014, taking the top spot from Charlotte which is now in 2nd place. Charlotte was the most popular girls’ name from 2011-2013 but has now fallen behind by 123 occurrences.

Olivia was the most popular baby girls’ name in the three most populous states (NSW, VIC, QLD) while Charlotte was top in SA, TAS and NT with the names Emily and Amelia being the most popular in WA and the ACT respectively.

Shorter names win out

Jack (3rd) beats out Jackson (5th) just as it beats out John (93rd). Archie (34th) beats Archer (40th) and Max (16th) is more popular than Maxwell (97th). Even for girls currently Lily (11th) is more popular than Lillian (86th) and Ella (13th) outranks Isabella (14th) and Isabelle (22nd).

Place names

Place names are still a source of inspiration and while Australian places are rising the ranks, many (such as Bronte, Avalon, Brighton and Arcadia) are yet to enter the Top 100, and others like Adelaide are now out of the Top 100.

Indeed Maddison (16th) outranks Victoria (80th) and Georgia (31st) and Indiana (60th) are ahead of Eden (68th). For boys overseas locations still dominate with Jordan (54th), Austin (61st) and Phoenix (94th) outranking Australian locations (with the exception of Hunter, 21st).

A royal influence

The original category of celebrities – the royals – have not only captured the loyalty and affections of modern Australians but continue to significantly influence their choice in baby names.

Prince William’s popularity first placed William in the Top 10 in 2001 and the name’s popularity has grown significantly since then. In 2011, the year of the royal wedding, William became the most popular boy’s name Australia-wide and maintained this position until 2012 when Oliver took the top spot. While William is the 2nd most popular name overall, it is still the most popular boy’s name in the ACT, and the NT.

The birth of Prince George (George Alexander Louis) in July 2013 has positively impacted the use of George by Australian parents, increasing George’s rank from 71st in 2012 to 60th in 2013 and 42nd in 2014 – its highest ranking since the 1950s. Alexander’s popularity has also been impacted with an increase in rank from 15th to 9th in 2014.

Despite having only influenced parents for a period of less than 18 months to the end of the 2014 calendar year, the number of baby boys named George has dramatically increased, from 364 in 2012 to 640 in 2014.

Download Baby Names Australia 2015. Click here to download the full report.

Australian Community Trends Report - Not-For-Profit Study

Thursday, April 30, 2015


Not-For-Profit Study

McCrindle and R2L are excited to launch the first annual not-for-profit study, the Australian Community Trends Report.

The study will provide data on the effectiveness, engagement and awareness of the not-for-profit sector. This snapshot of the sector includes:

  • A national survey of the Australian population to identify giving behaviours
  • Focus groups of Australians
  • An online supporter survey to each participating organisation
  • An internal stakeholder survey to leaders and staff in participating organisations

This study will identify national giving segments, understand and benchmark awareness of organisations, provide a Net Promoter Score for the sector and highlight the giving blockers and enablers for Australians.

Not-for-profit organisations are invited to attend a complimentary breakfast event in Melbourne on Tuesday the 5th of May or Sydney on Friday the 8th of May to hear more about the study.

Click here for more details about the event. If you have any questions regarding the study please contact Kirsten Brewer (02) 8824 3422 or kirsten@mccrindle.com.au


The Role of Career Practitioners in Our Schools

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Young Australians today are faced with an increasing challenge to transition successfully from school to further education, training or employment.

Research released today by the Career Industry Council of Australia (CICA) and McCrindle shows that while the most effective forms of career support for a young person is face-to-face contact with qualified career advisors and work experience, time and financial resources available to career practitioners in schools are currently inadequate to equip Australian school students in these capacities.

Cuts to key resources impact career decision-making

Research shows that the three most utilised resources by career practitioners to assist young people in making quality career decisions, including Job Guide, will cease to be produced or be severely diminished by the end of 2016 due to government funding cuts.

Executive Director of CICA, David Carney said “Quality career guidance inspires pupils toward further study, training or employment and enables them to make informed career decisions. It gives them invaluable insight into the world of work and what education and training paths they need to take to achieve their career goals. Contact with career and industry professionals is critical when teaching pupils how to network and open up their options for the future”.


Career practitioners need greater connection with Industry

Changes in technology and in the labour market have produced new vocational options, which, at present, are not well understood by many young people or their classroom teachers, increasing the need for contact with industry professionals.

Australia is approaching the biggest intergenerational employment transition ever and what is needed for students about to commence further study or work, in addition to world’s best education is world’s best careers advice,” says Mark McCrindle, principal of McCrindle. “Today’s school students will have more careers, and complete more courses than any previous generation and so career education in these complex times is more essential than ever.”

Research shows that career advisers need and want greater contact with employers and industry. 76% of career advisers who have been in their role for less than 2 years see industry connections as a critical aspect of enhancing their role.

Industry and schools need to find more innovative ways of developing these educational tools to respond to both the diminishing resources available as well as the limited time and financial resources of career advisors. Over 52% of career practitioners undertake their role part time and more than 4 in 5 (80%) schools have 1 or less fulltime equivalent career practitioners.

Research shows that over the past three years, career practitioners have been 1.75 times more likely to have had their time decreased rather than increased.

In 2014, CICA published a School Career Development Service Benchmark Resource. This resource has been developed for Principals and leadership teams of schools to help them achieve the best value and outcomes from their career development services. For a copy of the benchmark visit www.cica.org.au/quality-benchmarking.

Download the Infographic

Download the Infographic which features the findings of a national survey conducted by CICA of 937 career practitioners working in schools across Australia

For more information

For more information or media commentary, please contact Ashley McKenzie at McCrindle on 02 8824 3422

100 Years of Change

Monday, April 27, 2015

As Australia's social researchers, we love research that takes the pulse of the nation and reveals something of who we are. We are passionate about research that is engaging and that tells a story. So here are 35 interesting statistics about Australia, highlighting how much we have changed over the last 100 years!

100 years of change: 1915 to 2015

  1. In 1915 Australia was a young nation in more ways than one — our average age was just 24 compared to 37 today.
  2. Back then it was the Northern Territory which the census showed had the oldest median age (41.7) with Tasmania the youngest (with a median age of 22.4). A century later this has completely reversed with Tasmania being our oldest state (median age of 40.8) and the NT at 31.5 — the youngest.
  3. In 1915 men outnumbered women by more than 161,000. Today it is women who outnumber men in Australia by more than 105,000.
  4. In Australia in 1915, those aged 65 were classified as being of ‘old age’. Less than one in 20 Australians was aged 65 or over compared to almost one in five today.
  5. The number of aged pensioners has increased by more than 31 times in a century from 72,959 in 1915 to 2.3 million today.
  6. The percentage of the Australian population aged under 15 has halved over the last 100 years. While the under 15’s comprised 31 per cent in 1915, today they comprise just 15 per cent.
  7. Amazingly in 1915 there were 4,289 Australians ‘born at sea’, which meant that the 10th most likely birthplace for Australians born overseas was actually born at sea.
  8. Remarkably the top five birthplaces of Australians born overseas has hardly changed: In 1915 it was, in order UK, Germany, New Zealand, China and Italy. Today it is UK, New Zealand, China, India and Italy.
  9. Over the last 100 years Australia’s population has increased almost fivefold from just under five million to almost 24 million today.
  10. The average household today has two less people in it than in 1915: from an average of 4.5 people to just 2.6 people today.
  11. In 1915 there were 45,364 marriages registered per year while a century on there are 2.6 times more marriages registered at around 119,000 per year.
  12. However while marriages have increased by 2.6 times, divorce numbers are up 95.7 times. 1915 saw just 498 divorces recorded compared to today’s annual numbers exceeding 47,000.
  13. Back in 1915, Sydney was the city where most Aussies resided. However, Adelaide today has twice the population of Sydney back then.
  14. As many people live in Sydney today (4.9 million) as lived in the whole of Australia in 1915.
  15. Melbourne is seven times larger today than it was in 1915. In fact the Gold Coast has a larger population today than Melbourne had back then when it was home to the Commonwealth Parliament.
  16. Australia’s population growth rate has almost halved in a century from more than 3 per cent per annum to 1.6 per cent today. However it remains the second fastest growing nation in the developed world — in 1915 it was beaten only by Canada, and today only by Luxembourg.
  17. The population of Perth has seen the greatest growth rate of any Australian capital in a century. In 1915 the population of Perth was 106,792 while today it is 2,107,000 which is almost 20 times the size!
  18. Brisbane has also experienced great growth over the last century, increasing by 16.6 times its population of 139,480 back in 1915 to 2,329,000 today.
  19. The population of Adelaide has also experienced steady growth over the last 100 years from 189,646 people in 1915 to 1,318,000 today, which equates to 6.9 times its size of the century.
  20. Hobart has experienced the least growth of all Australia’s major cities, only increasing by 5.5 times its 1915 population of 39,937 to its current population of 220,000.
  21. In 1915 most of Australia’s population growth came from natural increase (births minus deaths) which accounted for almost three fifths of growth with just two fifths coming from net migrations (permanent arrivals from overseas minus permanent departures). Today this statistic is reversed with two fifths of our growth from natural increase and three fifths from immigration.
  22. In 1915 there were just 2,465 university students in Australia while today there are almost 1.2 million — an increase of 480 times!
  23. While a loaf of bread would have cost you 3½ pence in 1915, today a loaf could cost you around $2.50 and milk has gone from 3 pence per litre to $1.50 today. However land price rises have been even more significant with for example land blocks in newly developed suburbs such as Asquith for £200 compared to more than $600,000 today.
  24. Back in 1915, the vast majority of the population (96 per cent) associated themselves with the Christian faith, while today this has dropped to 61.1 per cent.
  25. A century ago the biggest religion after Christianity was Judaism (0.38 per cent) then Confucianism (0.12 per cent), Islam (0.09 per cent) and Buddhism (.07 per cent). Today Buddhism (2.5 per cent) has the most Australian adherents after Christianity followed by Islam (2.2 per cent), Hinduism (1.3 per cent) and Judaism (0.5 per cent).
  26. While all the mainstream religions other than Christianity have increased their share of the population, the option with the biggest increase has been “no religion” and “agnostic” having gone from 0.6 per cent a century ago to 22.5 per cent currently, an increase of more than 37 times.
  27. Today we have 4 times more students attending a state school than we did 100 years ago. Back in 1915, 593,059 students attended a state school compared to 2,406,495 today.
  28. There are also a lot more students attending private or catholic schools then there were 100 years ago, eight times more in fact. Back in 1915 only 156,106 attended a private or Catholic school, compared to 1,287,606 today.
  29. 100 years on, due to increased migration capacity, less residents of our population are Australian born than they were a century ago. Back in 1915 more than four in five (82 per cent) people were Australian-born. Over the century this figure has decreased to 71 per cent of the population.
  30. Australia’s European-born population has also decreased from 15 per cent of the total population in 1915 to 10 per cent 100 years later.
  31. In the last 100 years Australia has only planted two new cities: places that had no population base and are now stand-alone cities: Canberra (our 8th largest currently) and the Gold Coast (6th largest).
  32. By the end of World War 1, 420,000 men had enlisted which was around 39 per cent of the population of men aged 18 to 44. In 1915 there were 367,961 males aged 18 to 26.
  33. When WW1 began in 1914, there were 161,910 more males than females in Australia. By the end of 1918 there were 83,885 more females than males nationally.
  34. In WW1 there were 219,461 Australians killed, captured or injured in battle which was a casualty rate of almost two thirds of all those who embarked, and is the equivalent of one in five of the total 1915 Australian male population aged 18 to 44.
  35. The total Australian soldier casualties in WW1 exceeds the total number of adult males currently living in the state of Tasmania.

See the full article here


100 Years on from the ANZAC Sacrifice

Thursday, April 23, 2015

It was predicted that 2015 would be a year of reflection as the country remembers the centenary of the ANZACS at Gallipoli and the military sacrifices of the 100 years since. A recent survey conducted by McCrindle Research demonstrates the high regard in which modern day Australians hold the ANZACS and their impact on shaping the identity and values of Australia today.

A Year of Reflection

The lucky country is in 2015 being transformed into the reflective country. This is largely attributed to the centenary of the ANZAC landings, and on which rests the anticipation of record attendance at ANZAC services around the country as well as the big events at Gallipoli. But it isn’t only April 25th that will be big in the calendar, the entire year is set to have centenary reflections of Australians involvement with WW1, causing us to reflect on sacrifice, loss, duty and the makings of modern Australia.

‘2015 will see Australia unusually reflective. Self-analysis is not part of our national psyche yet the year ahead will see us looking back, looking in, and remembering. It will not be a year of sadness – just sombreness – the ‘no worries’ attitude subdued for a while. Australians love a celebration and this land of the long-weekend is good at enjoying the journey – but the year ahead will bring some heaviness to the journey, and some healthy introspection as well’.Mark McCrindle

ANZAC Spirit Alive Today

By the end of World War 1, 420,000 men had enlisted to serve at war, which was around 39% of the population of men aged 18 to 44. As we approach the centenary of ANZAC Day we take a look at the likelihood with which Aussie’s today would enlist to serve at war today.

Gen Y Men Most Likely To Enlist

While 1 in 4 (25%) Australians would enlist for a war today mirroring the global conflict of WW1, this figure increases to 1 in 3 (34%) among the male population across the country.

Gen Y males (aged 21-35) would be the most likely generation to enlist with more than 2 in 5 (42%) indicating so and mirroring the same representation of males aged 18 to 44, 100 years earlier (39%). As Australian males get older, the likelihood of them enlisting for war decreases.

There are 2.59 million Gen Y males in Australia today (those born 1980 to 1994). In this survey, 13% have stated that ‘yes definitely’ they would enlist in such a scenario, which equates to 335,482 from this age group (21-35 year olds) and is equivalent to the number that signed up in this age group a century ago.

ANZACS Influential in Shaping Australia’s National Identity

The characteristics which define us as a nation – mateship, freedom and respect have all been heavily influenced by the ANZACS and their sacrifice at Gallipoli 100 years ago according to modern day Australians.

Nearly all Australians surveyed consider the ANZACS to have been influential in shaping Australia’s ‘sacrifice for others’ characteristic (98%) and the Australian expression of ‘mateship’ (97%). More than 3 in 4 (78%) of those who indicated this felt the ANZACS were extremely or very influential in this regard, highlighting the formative role of the ANZACS when it comes to these components of Australia’s values and national identity.

Majority of Australians also believe that the Anzacs were heavily influential in shaping the following components of Australia’s character:

100 Years of Change in Australia


For More Information

For all media enquiries please contact the office on 02 8824 3422 or ashley@mccrindle.com.au.

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