What attendees will hear at the Melbourne Australian Communities Forum

Thursday, November 26, 2015

The Australian Communities Forum is happening again in Melbourne in just a week's time!

DOWNLOAD THE FULL EVENT PROGRAM HERE


Attendees are in for an excellent, informative and interactive day. Check out our event line up below:

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

ELIANE MILES | Research Manager, McCrindle

Australian communities in context

To introduce the day, Eliane will outline some of the key factors defining 21st century Australian communities and set some context around this national communities’ research.







MARK MCCRINDLE | Principal, McCrindle Research

Australian Community Trends Report; Results from the national research study

This inaugural national study reveals is based on extensive research of the Australian public as well as current donors and also national research of staff and leaders working in Australia’s not-for-profit sector. This session will reveal the fascinating results including the National Giving Macro Segments, Giving Blockers and enablers, the giving sentiment matrix, donor priorities, the donor participation scale, the engagement hierarchy and the sector’s Net Promoter Score. In addition to sharing the key insights, attendees will be given practical steps in how to strategically respond to these illuminating findings.


GEORGE SAVVIDES | CEO, Medibank Private & Chairman of World Vision Australia

The change journey; leading teams and engaging workplace communities through cultural transformation

In his thirteen years as CEO of Medibank Private, George has led the organisation from government ownership to public listing, and this IPO was the second largest in Australia’s history. He has recently transitioned this organisation which has a customer base of 3.9 million Australians to new headquarters with a layout design to create a collaborative workplace. As chair of World Vision Australia, he has also given governance to one of Australia’s best known charities in these times of unprecedented change.


CLAIRE MADDEN | Research Director, McCrindle

Understanding the power of collaborative communities

Responding to the megatrends transforming Australia will ensure that organisations remain relevant in these changing times. From demographic change to generational transitions, from new technologies to emerging consumers, communities are changing and so is the workforce. This introductory session will give leaders insights into how to respond to this and create a culture of collaborative innovation.




REBECCA KOTOW | Head of Social Impact & Community Investment, NAB

Innovating and adapting to influence change and impact communities 

In her role as head of social impact and community investment at NAB, Rebecca and her team are responsible for micro-finance, impact investment and the community engagement of one of Australia’s largest organisations. NAB is regarded as a leading innovator in not only the communities’ space, but in workplace engagement as well. Their new headquarters at Docklands and the phenomenal work space community that is The Village, along with the employee engagement programs that Rebecca leads are all great examples of people-focused innovation.


FAY CALDERONE | Lawyer and partner at DibbsBarker

Engaging workplace communities

Fay is a legal specialist in workplace and employment engagement. In this session she will outline how to create engaging workplace communities and effectively manage cultural change. An increasingly central community in Australian society is the workplace community and Fay will deliver insights into how to harness talent, drive purpose and alignment, and create a thriving and healthy workplace.





SARAH PRESCOTT | Head of Marketing and Communications, Thankyou

The Thankyou story

Thankyou is an Aussie success story, not only because of the growth of this water, food and products company, but the business model it utilises to impact and fund impoverished communities. In this inspiring closing session, Sarah will outline the Thankyou model for empowering everyday Australians to change the world through simple choices in their everyday life. She will share what has made Thankyou a household name through creating effective, fresh and motivating marketing that cut through the noise and achieved something great.



THE AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITY TRENDS INFOGRAPHIC

At the event, we will also be launching the results from the sector-wide, not-for-profit study. Mark McCrindle will deliver a presentation on the Australian Community Trends Report and will share the results from the national research study. This inaugural national study is based on extensive research of the Australian public as well as current donors and also national research of staff and leaders working in Australia’s not-for-profit sector. All delegates will receive a copy of the Australian Community Trends Infographic, visualising the results:

BUZZ GROUP SPEAKERS


TIM SURGENOR | Founding Director, DataMotive

Creating compassionate commercialism

One of Australia’s most important community trends is the rise of social enterprises; entrepreneurial organisations which operate to empower communities and make a difference for those in need. As the founder of DataMotive, Tim will share his story of building a business that transforms communities as well as highlighting how other organisations can utilise “impact-sourcing” and ethical buying to not only manage their costs but support ultra-poor communities.



GREG LOW | Co-founder, R2L

The power of visual story telling

Greg is an expert at helping organisations tell their story, especially through visual communications. With professional skills both behind the camera as well as in shaping campaigns and advising not-for-profits, he has a depth of experience in helping organisations create engaging content and telling their brand story.



NICHOLAS BOLTO | Managing Director, Olympus Solutions

The trust factor: giving confidence to donors 

Nic is a not-profit consultant who developed The Difference Index, an annual measure which assists in credentialing charities and their impact. Nic will review what donors are looking for and ways you can qualify your marketing claims to increase donor confidence



HEATH MCSOLVIN | Director of Fundraising, CBM 

Retaining long term donors while attracting Gen Y and Z

As Director of Fundraising at CBM Australia, Heath has worked across the mainly disciplines of fundraising for more than 20 years. During that time, he’s seen the changing face of donors - how to acquire them and how to keep them! Heath will share with you some of the insights he has found in finding new ways to recruit donors and important pathways that need to be built to keep them.



JAMES MAINE and NICK HARRINGTON-JOHNSON | Monash University

The power of big data to focus and grow organisations 

James and Nicholas are Econometrics Honours students at Monash University and they have a head for numbers and a heart of not-for-profits. While organisations collect more data than ever, there are simple ways to exploit this data gold mine with traditional statistical techniques and alternatives such as text mining and sentiment analysis. In this session, they will illustrate some examples of cropping, visualising and analysing data and texts from socio media and online data sources.



NICK DUBE | Founder & Creative Director, Heartburst Digital 

Digital Storytelling and the donor experience 

As the founder and creative director of Heartburst Digital, Nick is an expert at creating a compelling brand story through online channels. Based on his extensive experience with not-for-profits, he will give insights in how little online changes can make a big communications difference.



ASHLEY MCKENZIE | Team Leader of Communications, McCrindle 

Social media tips and tricks 

In an era of message-saturation, the challenge for organisations is to deliver quality content that will cut through the noise. In this session, Ashley McKenzie, who leads the communications strategy at McCrindle, will share tips and tactics on how to best influence through social media and which platforms engage different communities.

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE YOUR TICKET TO THE MELBOURNE AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES FORUM

FOR A VIDEO RECAP OF OUR SYDNEY EVENT ON 13TH NOVEMBER 2015:

Australian Communities Forum, Sydney November 13, 2015 from Power Creative on Vimeo.

Q and A: An ageing population and the birth rate

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Is Australia’s population ageing partly because there are more women remaining childless, mothers having fewer children and overall fewer babies being born?

It is true that Australia’s population is ageing with the midpoint in our population – the median age having increased from 30 to 37 in the span of 3 decades. However this is largely due to increased longevity and not at all to do with declining births.

In fact Australia is in the midst of a baby boom with the numbers of births setting new records this decade- having exceeded 300,000 births per year, every year since 2008. This is almost twice as many births as Australia experienced in 1946- the year that saw the arrival of the first Baby Boomers. While the peak of Australia’s original baby boom occurred in 1961 with a fertility rate of 3.5 (babies per 1,000 women), which is almost twice the current fertility rate of 1.9, total annual births currently exceed the 1961 record of 240,000 births by more than 60,000.

So the current baby boom is much larger than this original 16 year baby boom (1946-1961) and the total Australian births in the 16 years from 2008 will produce almost 5 million babies – around 1.5 million more than the post-war boom.

Not only are there more babies than ever, but there are more women who are mothers as well. There are more than 6.5 million Australian women aged over 18 who have given birth which is almost 70% of them. It is the case that women are having children later in life with the median age of mothers having increased from 25.5 four decades ago to 30.8 today. However the fertility rates have increased not decreased in the last decade, up from 1.7 in the early 2000’s to 1.9 today. And as for the proportion of women in Australia who will have no children in their lifetime – it remains at 1 in 4 which is a figure unchanged over a generation. Therefore of the women who will have children, the average number of children is actually 2.5.

So Australian mothers are more numerous than ever, collectively parenting more children than ever and on average raising between 2 and 3 of this largest generation in Australia’s history.

More information can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.


The Australian Communities Forum Video

Monday, November 23, 2015

On Friday 13th November, McCrindle Research and R2L&Associates were proud to present the Sydney Australian Communities Forum. The ACF featured 13 brilliant speakers and 4 jam-packed buzz-group sessions. Overall it was a brilliant and packed day. Thank you to all the expert speakers who contributed and those who attended and shared their thoughts and expertise.

Check out this video from Power Creative for a recap of the day and some of the highlights:

Australian Communities Forum, Sydney November 13, 2015 from Power Creative on Vimeo.


We then heard from Mark McCrindle on the Australian Community Trends Report where he shared the results from the national research study. This inaugural national study is based on extensive research of the Australian public as well as current donors and also national research of staff and leaders working in Australia’s not-for-profit sector.Some of these results included the National Giving Macro Segments, Giving Blockers and Enablers, the Giving Sentiment Matrix, Donor Priorities, the Donor Participation Scale, the Engagement Hierarchy, and the sector's Net Promoter Score. All delegates were given a copy of the Australian Community Trends Infographic, visualising the results below. Image of Mark by Power Creative.

Melbourne Australian Communities Forum 2015


We are now busily preparing for our Melbourne Australian Communities Forum, on Thursday 3rd December 2015. Our keynote speakers include:

View the full program here.


Sydney's most liveable suburbs: The urban living index

Thursday, November 19, 2015

With Sydney’s population set to reach 5 million next year, there are significant densification trends underway. Sydneysiders are increasingly embracing medium and high density housing, 7 in 10 either have lived in a unit/apartment or are currently living in one. Of Sydneysiders who have never lived in a high density setting, 50% would consider unit/apartment living and this rises to 63% for Generation Y.

“Over the last decade there has been a big swing in Sydney to more urban living generally in apartments. To gain a clearer understanding of urban living patterns and satisfaction Urban Taskforce Australia commissioned McCrindle, experts in researching demographic data to develop the Urban Living Index.”, said Urban Taskforce CEO, Chris Johnson.

Mark McCrindle, Principal of McCrindle Research says, “The challenge for Sydney’s future is to ensure that it responds to population growth yet maintains its world-beating lifestyle and that its liveability rises to match its increasing density, and that is why we have developed the Urban Living Index.”

CHECK OUT THE URBAN LIVING INDEX WEBSITE HERE, TO DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT

Measuring the liveability of areas across Sydney

The Urban Living Index is an ongoing measure of the liveability of suburbs in Sydney. This instrument considers the affordability, community, employability, amenity and accessibility of an area to determine how liveable it is.

The Planning Regions of Sydney

The NSW Planning Regions were developed by the NSW government to allow for cohesive and integrated planning under A Plan for Growing Sydney. Exploring the Index across the six regions assists in understanding how they are equipped to respond to a high density population and where there are opportunities for improvement in the quality of urban living.

Sydney’s most liveable suburbs

This analysis of Sydney’s 228 suburbs shows that Surry Hills and Crows Nest - Waverton are Sydney’s leaders with the top rated Index of 85. In the Central planning region after Surry Hills was Marrickville with 83, in the North it was North Sydney – Lavender Bay with 82, West Central was Parramatta – Rosehill 80 followed by North Parramatta 75, South was Hurstville 76 followed by South Hurstville – Blakehurst 74, South West was Liverpool – Warwick Farm 66 followed by Cabramatta – Lansvale and West was Springwood – Winmalee 59 followed by Blaxland – Warrimoo – Lapstone 59. The results show a strong correlation between high density housing and urban liveability with seven of the top ten rated suburbs in the top twenty highest density suburbs in Sydney.

Sentiment toward housing affordability

One of the key drivers of the growth in high density housing is Sydney’s housing affordability challenge. When Sydneysiders were asked if they had to start over and buy into the current property market, more than 3 in 5 (61%) of Sydneysiders would probably or definitely be unable to do so. Sydneysiders are also not convinced that the affordability challenge will change with 51% saying that in three years’ time their area will be less affordable than it is today, and only 11% saying it will be more affordable. This is even higher in the West planning region where 56% say it will be less affordable. It is also higher amongst Generation Y (56%) than Baby Boomers (47%). More than half of all Sydneysiders (59%) say that Sydney’s housing affordability is a massive challenge for their children’s generation with an additional 29% saying it is a significant challenge.

More than half of all Sydneysiders (57%) state that the construction of units and apartments assists affordability. More than a third of Sydneysiders support the idea of allowing first home buyers to access their superannuation to buy a home (37%) and increasing unit/apartment construction (36%) while only 1 in 5 (22%) supports the tightening of bank lending rules as a solution to affordability.

The most valuable assets of Sydneysiders

When it comes to housing, Sydneysiders prioritise the intangibles (location and community) above the tangibles (buildings and fittings) by a factor of 2 to 1. They also prioritise current liveability above long term price growth, also by a factor of 2 to 1 and value walkable communities above more mobile lifestyles by a factor of 6 to 1. Sydneysiders generally like their local community assets such as shops and cafes with more than half (52%) saying they totally love or really like them compared to just 6% who are indifferent to this amenity. Twice as many (32%) believe that amenities in their local community will increase over the next 3 years compared to those who think there will be a decrease (16%). Sydneysiders are also positive about the growing infrastructure, transport and accessibility of their local area, with 37% expecting it to increase over the next three years compared to 14% expecting a decrease.

The Urban Living Index report, interactive maps and further details on Sydney’s six planning regions are all available at www.urbanlivingindex.com. The Urban Living Index results and rankings will be launched at a breakfast event at Clayton Utz, Level 5 1 Bligh Street, Sydney on the 10th December 2015, 7:30am for 8am start. Speakers will be Chris Johnson and Mark McCrindle.


The Australian Communities Forum Sydney Recap

Monday, November 16, 2015

Last Friday, McCrindle Research and R2L&Associates were proud to present the Sydney Australian Communities Forum. The ACF featured 13 brilliant speakers and 4 jam-packed sessions.


Claire Madden opened the event with a session on understanding the power of collaborative communities. She gave a snapshot of our changing communities, how we can understand and interpret the emerging generations and best utilise the power of collaborative communities.

Image by Power Creative


We then heard from Mark McCrindle on the Australian Community Trends Report where he shared the results from the national research study. This inaugural national study is based on extensive research of the Australian public as well as current donors and also national research of staff and leaders working in Australia’s not-for-profit sector.

Image by Power Creative


Mark’s session revealed the fascinating results including the National Giving Macro Segments, Giving Blockers and Enablers, the Giving Sentiment Matrix, Donor Priorities, the Donor Participation Scale, the Engagement Hierarchy, and the sector's Net Promoter Score. All delegates were given a copy of the Australian Community Trends Infographic, visualising the results:

R2L & Associates co-founder Jon Rose then shared the implications of these findings on the not-for-profit sector and attendees were given practical steps on how to strategically respond to these illuminating findings.

Image by Power Creative



Our keynote speakers

Partner and lawyer at DibbsBarker Fay Calderone shared key insights on how to create engaging workplace communities, and that inspiration, vision and motivation is key. Fay reminded us that in an organisation, culture will eat compliance for breakfast every time, and reiterated the need for us to build healthy and values-based workplace culture.

Image by Power Creative



Glen Gerreyn from the Hopefull Institute spoke brilliantly on the need for hope, inspiration and motivation in our teams and lives. Glen reminded us that we need to have more dreams than memories, that failing is a part of the process and encouraged us to fail forward.

Image by Power Creative



Amanda Rose from Western Sydney Women shared how we can be strategic connectors in our online and offline worlds, and how our attitude can make or break our cause.

Image by Power Creative



Equipping our delegates

The Australian Communities Forum was an interactive day based around an innovative format. After a hearty buffet lunch, delegates participated in a number of 15 minute practical buzz groups to be equipped with practical insights about engaging their communities.

Creating compassionate commercialism, Tim Surgenor, DataMotive

The power of visual storytelling, Greg Low, R2L&Associates

Using brand to engage your community, Fran Avon, Wesley Mission

Transforming communities through cultural change, Karen James, On-Purpose Hub

Putting care back into community through quality CRM, Justin Yoon, AlpaSys

Data visualisation – bringing research data to life, Ben Duffin, McCrindle


To further explore the research component of the Australian Communities Trends Report, our Future communities workshop presented the results from the environmental scan of the not-for-profit sector, where a panel of experts gave an overview of the emerging trends, challenges and opportunities which will impact Australian communities overt the decade ahead.



It was also a privilege to have Sarah Prescott, head of marketing and communications at Thankyou wrap up our conference and share with us about the inspiring Thankyou story and the journey her organisation has been on. She inspired our delegates to know the why behind what they do, and challenged us with ‘who says we have to do things the way they have been done before’?




Overall it was a brilliant and packed day. Thank you to all the expert speakers who contributed and those who attended and shared their thoughts and expertise.

Melbourne Australian Communities Forum 2015


We are now busily preparing for our Melbourne Australian Communities Forum, on the 3rd December 2015. Our keynote speakers include:

Watch this space for the program, which will be released very soon!

What attendees will hear at the Sydney Australian Communities Forum

Thursday, November 05, 2015

The Australian Communities Forum is happening again in Sydney in just over a week's time!

DOWNLOAD THE FULL EVENT PROGRAM HERE


Attendees are in for an excellent, informative and interactive day. Check out our event line up below:

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS



CLAIRE MADDEN | Research Director, McCrindle

Understanding the power of collaborative communities

Responding to the megatrends transforming Australia will ensure that organisations remain relevant in these changing times. From demographic change to generational transitions, from new technologies to emerging consumers, communities are changing and so is the workforce. This introductory session will give leaders insights into how to respond to this and create a culture of collaborative innovation.





MARK MCCRINDLE | Principal, McCrindle Research

Australian Community Trends Report; Results from the national research study

This inaugural national study reveals is based on extensive research of the Australian public as well as current donors and also national research of staff and leaders working in Australia’s not-for-profit sector. This session will reveal the fascinating results including the National Giving Macro Segments, Giving Blockers and enablers, the giving sentiment matrix, donor priorities, the donor participation scale, the engagement hierarchy and the sector’s Net Promoter Score. In addition to sharing the key insights, attendees will be given practical steps in how to strategically respond to these illuminating findings.


FAY CALDERONE | Lawyer and partner at DibbsBarker

Engaging workplace communities

Fay is a legal specialist in workplace and employment engagement. In this session she will outline how to create engaging workplace communities and effectively manage cultural change. An increasingly central community in Australian society is the workplace community and Fay will deliver insights into how to harness talent, drive purpose and alignment, and create a thriving and healthy workplace.






GLEN GERREYN | Director of the Hopefull Institute & nationally renowned youth expert & communicator

Creating community amongst the emerging generations

Hear from one of Australia’s most prolific youth communicators as he defines the key challenges facing the emerging generations and the most effective strategies to engage, inspire, influence and lead this emerging generation of supporters, volunteers and staff members.





STEPH PRESCOTT | Head of Marketing and Communications, Thankyou

The Thankyou story

Thankyou is an Aussie success story, not only because of the growth of this water, food and products company, but the business model it utilises to impact and fund impoverished communities. In this inspiring closing session, Sarah will outline the Thankyou model for empowering everyday Australians to change the world through simple choices in their everyday life. She will share what has made Thankyou a household name through creating effective, fresh and motivating marketing that cut through the noise and achieved something great.



AMANDA ROSE | CEO of The Business Woman Media & Founding Director of Western Sydney Women

Growing communities through strategic connections and social communications

Amanda is an expert strategic connector and uses the power of social media and digital technologies to create communities, empower individuals and network organisations. In this session she will discuss the power of strategic connections, how to build an online presence and how to grow relationships to build staff, customer and client communities.





BUZZ GROUP SPEAKERS



TIM SURGENOR | Founding Director, DataMotive

Creating compassionate commercialism

One of Australia’s most important community trends is the rise of social enterprises; entrepreneurial organisations which operate to empower communities and make a difference for those in need. As the founder of DataMotive, Tim will share his story of building a business that transforms communities as well as highlighting how other organisations can utilise “impact-sourcing” and ethical buying to not only manage their costs but support ultra-poor communities.



GREG LOW | Co-founder, R2L

The power of visual story telling

Greg is an expert at helping organisations tell their story, especially through visual communications. With professional skills both behind the camera as well as in shaping campaigns and advising not-for-profits, he has a depth of experience in helping organisations create engaging content and telling their brand story.



FRAN AVON | Executive Manager, Communications, Fundraising and Volunteering, Wesley Mission

Using brand to engage your community

In this session, Communications Manager Fran Avon at Wesley Mission has just led the organisation through a significant rebrand. As one of Australia’s leading charities, this process for Wesley was complex and the insights that has come from the journey are very useful for other organisations.



KAREN JAMES | Founder, CEO & author of On Purpose Hub

Transforming Communities through Cultural Change

Karen is an expert in creating cultural change in business communities and was instrumental in the establishment of CommBank’s Women in Focus community. In this session she will share how to manage change, build community and shape the business world through contagious leadership.



JUSTIN YOON | Director, AlphaSys

Putting the care back into community through CRM

Justin has founded one of Australia’s leading Salesforce CRM implementation and integration specialists with a strong focus on the non-profit sector. His consultative approach helps organisations use the right technologies to drive effective acquisition, engagement and achievement of mission.



BEN DUFFIN | Research Visualisation Manager, McCrindle

The 5 essentials to visualise reports and bring research data to life

In an era of big data and information overload, the challenge for organisations is to deliver quality content in a compelling way. In this session, Ben Duffin, who leads the renowned research visualisation output of McCrindle, will provide insights into how to effectively communicate using visual tools.

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE YOUR TICKET TO THE SYDNEY AUSTRALIAN COMMUNITIES FORUM

The Changing Face of Melbourne

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Melbourne is booming with its population set to overtake Sydney as Australia’s biggest city in the next few decades. It’s Australia’s multicultural, hospitality and sporting heart and the fastest growing city in Australia.

By 2056, it could reach 9,000,000 residents and become the nation’s biggest city. While 1 in 4 Australians live in Victoria, three quarters of them live in Melbourne. The many suburbs and tribes that make up Victoria’s capitol are evolving in ways our grandparents could never have predicted. 

More than half of all new housing approvals are in the medium or high density housing so the future actually will be for the vertical communities rather than the horizontal sprawl in the past. Compared to the rest of Australia, Melbourne has a young population with an average age of 36 years compared to the Australian average of 37. 

Residents in East Melbourne have the city’s highest income of $1,989, while 75% of people in Parkville have university degrees. 64% of Sandhurst residents are married, while Carlton only have 16% married couples. The motorcar is king in the west, with residents in Plumpton owning 2.6 cars per household. Culturally diverse, vibrant & picture perfect, Melbourne has a very bright future. 

Watch Mark McCrindle in the three part series on Channel 7 below: 

Part One:

Part Two:

Part Three:

Sydney: Australia's most religious city

Thursday, October 08, 2015

There has much discussion of the decline of religion in Australia as measured by the last two Census’ (2006 and 2011) with the total stating “no religion” increasing from 18.7 to 22.3 over this five year period. Additionally the decline in the total identifying with a Christian denomination decreased from 64% to 61%.

However nationally the percentage identifying as Pentecostal, Salvation Army, Seventh-Day Adventist, and “other protestant” saw no decline and those in the Christian (not further defined) category saw an increase. Sydney is Australia’s most religious capital city with the lowest proportion of residents stating “no religion” (17.6%), while Hobart (29.4%) and Canberra (28.9%) have the highest proportion of populations not identifying with any religion.

The two dominant Christian identities nationally are Catholic (25.3%) and Anglican (17.1%). However Hobart is the one capital where Anglican (26.2%) outranks Catholic (20.3%) while Melbourne has the biggest differential between the two with Catholic (27.2%) more than twice the adherents as Anglican (10.8%). However it is Sydney that is the most Catholic of the capitals with 28.3%, and well ahead of Anglican at 16.1%. The areas of Sydney that have the highest identification with Christianity are in the South West with Menai, Mulgoa, Narellan, Warragamba and Horsley Park all areas rating above 80% Christianity. Sydney is also the only capital where a religion other than Christianity ranks in the top 3 (Islam, at 4.7%) with Auburn (42%) and Lakemba (49%) having the highest proportion of residents identifying with Islam.

Australia’s largest city, Sydney, is a religiously diverse one, and there is a strong link between location and religion as seen by these maps:

  • Catholic
  • Anglican
  • Judaism
  • Islam

For an in-depth visual look of Sydney by religious identification simply click on the interactive map above, and select the religions you would like to analyse by selecting the Visible layers box and options. You can also zoom in to look at specific areas of Sydney, or hover over a suburb to read the data.

About McCrindle Research Services

Utilising the right tools and methods and analysing the data is just half of the research process. Because the goal is implementation, the findings need the skills of visualisation and communication. As researchers we understand the methods, but we’re also designers and communicators so we know how to present the findings in ways that will best engage.

Geomapping is a new tool we have and we will be releasing more information and blog pieces on this exciting new output.

Let us know via social media if you have any topics you would like to be geomapped!

Connect with us on:

The Australian Communities Forum

Wednesday, October 07, 2015

The Australian Communities Forum is happening again in Sydney and Melbourne 2015!

The ACF exists to help organisations understand and connect with their communities. From local, staff, constituent, membership, customer and special interest communities, this forum is focused on how to build, shape and engage communities in all their diversity.

BOOK YOUR EARLY BIRD TICKET TO THE SYDNEY #ACF15 HERE

BOOK YOUR EARLY BIRD TICKET TO THE MELBOURNE #ACF15 HERE


Whether you’re part of a community-based organisation, a charity, a government agency or a commercial organisation with a community focus, the Australian Communities Forum will deliver the latest information in an interactive format, with innovative local examples, and the sharing of great ideas.

At the one day Australian Communities Forum you will hear:

  • Results from the Australian Communities National Research study
  • Case studies of innovative community engagement projects
  • Practical, best practice workshops providing innovative strategies to equip and empower
  • Keynote sessions on volunteer engagement, motivating teams, generational change, segmentation engagement and effective public and media communication strategies.

Stay tuned for more information on guest keynote speakers, the program and more!

Keep up to date with The Australian Communities Forum 2015 on Facebook.


Q and A: Offline Parenting in an Online World

Friday, October 02, 2015

What are the key strategies to offline parenting in an online world?

Parents today are faced with an unprecedented challenge of raising their children to be engaged offline in a world dominated by online options. A recent study conducted by McCrindle Research showed that whilst 44% of the older generations see the benefit of technology to children in enhancing learning and productivity, two thirds (65%) said that they believe that school aged students today spend too much time on technology.

In a society where digital is default, parents often feel the tension of raising their children in these technologically saturated times yet ensuring that they have the timeless characteristics and qualities to thrive in the offline environment. Parents see firsthand the extraordinary opportunities that technology facilitates, yet their experience tells them that managing their children’s screen time and ensuring they gain life skills and social skills is also essential.

We often forget how quickly this great screen age has emerged. Facebook went public just a decade ago and the tablet devices which facilitate so much learning and interaction such as the iPad arrived just half a decade ago. While many of the benefits to this first-ever digitally-based, wif- connected, social-media driven, global generation are evident, so are some emerging challenges. 1 in 4 Australians aged 15-17 have not participated in any form of physical recreation or sport in the last 12 months and for those aged 18-24 it is 1 in 3. These “screenagers” have a propensity towards increased sedentary lifestyles and based on the current overweight trends amongst Australia’s youth, by 2027, when all of Generation Z have reached adulthood, 78% of males and 62% of females in this generation are likely to be overweight. Young people spending hours in front of screens is not new. Today’s parents averaged around 3 hours of TV time per day during their formative years. However the TV screen is a “lean back” screen and did not generate the same levels of time use, sleep impediments and addictive patterns of the portable, interactive and connected “lean forward” screens of today.

Parents are the key influencers when it comes to shaping the priorities and lifestyle habits of their children, so households where active offline activities are modelled, prioritised and encouraged are likely to see the rewards of these behaviours established in the next generation. Parents have the opportunity to encourage their children to engage in physical recreation not just virtual entertainment, in offline communities’ not just online networks, and face to face interaction not just screen-based communication. And if the modelling and encouraging is too subtle, parents ought remember that they are paying the internet and mobile accounts and they are in charge. Oh, and every modem comes with an off switch!

More on effective parenting strategies can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.


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