Australia's Kidult Phenomenon

Friday, September 20, 2013

For many young Australians, home is still where the heart is. In fact, 29 percent of 18 to 34 year-olds are still living at home.

Mark McCrindle joins Larry and Kylie on The Morning Show to discuss Australia’s Kidult Phenomenon.


Comparing 1976 with 2011


In 2011, only 42 per cent of young adults were living with a partner - and only half of those couples had children. But if we travel back to 1976, we see a surprising trend: 65 percent of young adults lived with a partner, and 3 in 4 of them had children.

A number of trends contribute to the ‘staying with mum and dad’ phenomenon. In 2011, 26% of adults aged 18-34 were studying, compared to 14% in 1976. But statistics also tell a different story – young adults are not necessarily at home because they are building their careers, with only 69% of 18-34 year olds working 40 hours or more per week in 2011, compared to 84% doing the same in 1976.


Top 5 trends keeping young adults from leaving home


  1. Studying longer
  2. Starting families later
  3. Delaying career & earnings
  4. Higher housing costs
  5. More flexibility & lifestyle options

What about the future?


Is it the parents who want their kids to stay home until they’re married, or is it the kids who don’t want to leave?

How does Australia compare to other countries when it comes to this type of living arrangement? Looking into the future, are we likely to see this trend continuing?

View the segment to find out:

For more videos of Mark in the media, visit the McCrindle Research Media Page.

The Downageing Generation

Monday, September 09, 2013

Australians are living longer than ever before and this remarkable growth in longevity is the primary cause of our ageing population. 

With Australians living longer, they are also working later and remaining active as grandparents more and later in life than ever before.

Many older Australians are in a life stage significantly younger than their age. 20th Century expectations of age can no longer be applied in the 21st Century, as traditional demographics don’t match new psychographics. From technology uptake to working longer, older Australians are not just “retired and wired” but working, leading and influencing later in life than has ever been seen.

Here’s a demographic snapshot of the downageing situation:


Comparative analysis of Australia’s 60-year-olds


1953

2013

National population

The total population has more than doubled.

10 million

23 million

Average age of becoming a grandparent

Grandparents are older chronologically but younger psychologically.

54-56

58-60

Life expectancy at birth

We can expect to live 12 years longer today than in 1953.

M:67

F: 73

M:80

F: 84

Life expectancy at 65

65’s of today are like 58’s of a generation ago in terms of longevity.

12-15

19-22

Source: McCrindle Research, ABS



Australia’s new grandparents: Younger than their parents were at the same age


Australia’s new grandparents, aged 60 are the Baby Boomers. Since the Boomers (born 1946-1964), we’ve seen Generation X (born 1965-1979), Gen Y (born 1980-1994) and this year Generation Z (born since 1995) enter adulthood and the Boomers are now grandparenting Generation Alpha.

But they are a generation of “downagers” – younger than their parents were at the same age, younger than their age would suggest, and based on the life expectancy rates, a 65 year old grandparent is more like a 58 year old of a generation ago.


Statistical summary of today’s downageing population


  • Demographic mid-life for an Australian has been pushed back to 50 years for a male, and 52 for a female in terms of adult years lived (since turning 18) and adult years to go (32 years lived since turning 18 and 32 years life expectancy for a male aged 50, and 34 adult years lived and 34 to go on average for a female).
  • The median age of employed persons in industries such as Education and Health is now 45 years – so while there are many workers in their 20’s, there are many in their 60’s, resulting in a median age of 45.
  • Today's grandparents are a working generation: 1 in 4 males aged 68 are employed full time, and 1 in 10 females aged 68 are employed full time.

Remember that many of today’s 60-something leaders have been in leadership since their 20’s and 30’s – they were needed during the boom years of the 50’s and 60’s. They also see no need to stop leading – having gained experience through decades and a lot of life left, they continue leading many of Australia’s businesses and industries.

For further research and an occupation breakdown of workers 65+, see our entry Older Workers, Downagers, and Redefining Retirement.

Australia’s Changing Household Landscape

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Nuclear family no longer most common household


For the first time in Australia's history, the nuclear family will no longer be the most common household – while today they make up 33% of all households, within just a year the couple only household will be the most common type of household.


Multi-generational households


With the decline of the nuclear household structure, we are often seeing three generations living under one roof: Baby boomers are being sandwiched by taking care of their own parents (the builders), while still having their Gen Y children living with them and studying.


Boomerang kids


This type of arrangement is a significant financial advantage for Gen Y KIPPERS (Kids In Parents’ Pockets Eroding Retirement Savings) who may be saving $15,000 per year on rent alone by living with their parents. For mum and dad, however, retirement plans are delayed and retirement savings significantly decrease. Baby Boomer parents, while enjoying the social interactions available in a multigenerational household, can often feel the pressure and may feel like their hard work is being taken for granted.

Household situations can also get financially tight when couples split – in Australia, the average age of a couple separating is 38, with an average of 2 children involved in the separation. Oftentimes in this situation couples stay together because it is simply not financially viable to move out.


Record births, older parents, increase in family size


Australian families are changing dramatically, with record birth rates taking place – over 300,000 babies are being born every year, more than were born in the original baby boom post WWII. It is not that more women are deciding to have children, but those that are having children are deciding to have more than previously, and as a result Australia is seeing an increase in the family size.


Household size grows after a century of shrinkage


Household size has been declining for the last 100 years. In 1911, the average household size for Australia was 4.5. By 2006, it had fallen to 2.53. But in 2011, something remarkable happened. Household size increased. Only by a small amount, but enough to raise it to the current 2.6 people per household. The multi-gen household and boomerang kids have turned around a 100-year trend and created expanding household size.


Today's children and teenagers: a snapshot of Generation Z


They are the true Millennial generation: the 4 million Australians born since the year 2000. On average they will live longer, stay in education later, and work across more careers than any prior generation. They are the most materially supplied, technologically saturated, globally connected  and formally educated generation  ever. They are living through their formative years in a time of massive demographic transformation: our population growing by more people in a decade than ever, more culturally diverse than ever, and older than ever.

In the nearly 14 years of their lifespan they have seen more change than any cohort before them. They began life when Australia’s birth rate was declining and soon hit its lowest ebb in history, yet are now part of record annual births- exceeding 300,000 per year. They began their life in the internet era but are being shaped in the world of social media. While the PC era dominated their birth years, the mobile device era is transformative today. With the oldest entering their teen years, their lexicons are filled with terms that didn’t exist at their birth: apps, tweets, tablets, status updates and cloud computing.

Only occasionally does massive demographic change collide with huge technological growth, and significant social change- yet this is exactly what Generation Z has experienced. The confluence of these trends has so transformed their society, it is radically different to the times that shaped their parents and unrecognizable to the world their grandparents first knew.

Generation Z: Understanding and Engaging the Emerging Generations

Thursday, August 01, 2013

From the Baby Boomers and Generation X and Generation Y, it is now Generation Z and Generation Alpha that are emerging.

These new generations are global, social, visual and technological. They are the most connected, educated and sophisticated generations ever. They are the up-agers, with influence beyond their years. They are the tweens, the teens, the youth and young adults of our global society. They are the early adopters, the brand influencers, the social media drivers, the pop-culture leaders. They comprise nearly 2 billion people globally, and they don’t just represent the future, they’re creating it. To understand the trends, to respond to the changes, and to be positioned to thrive in these changing times, it is essential to understand these next gens.

Who are Today’s Gen Zs?

Gen Zs are demographically changed – growing up in an era of Australia’s largest baby boom since the birth of the Boomer generation, and are living in an era of changing household structures. They are generationally changed – shaped in a society with an increasingly ageing population. They are digitally transformed – seamlessly integrating technology into their everyday realities. They are globally focused through the emergence of global pop culture, global brands, and a borderless virtual reality. They are educationally transformed – moving past structural and linear learning – and they are socially defined, connected to and shaped by their peers.

Gen Zs at Work: How to attract, retaining, managing & training emerging generations

While Generation Z are still largely in the education system and only just beginning to emerge into the workforce, within a decade they will comprise almost 1 in 5 workers. The oldest cohort of Gen Zs are now 19 years old, many of whom are entering the workforce for the very first time. How can employers understand and engage with the needs of these new employees?

Over the last couple of years the realities of massive generational change have dawned on many business leaders. While the issues of an ageing population and a new attitude to work have literally been emerging for a generation, it has been a sudden awakening for many organisations. In fact dealing with these demographic changes and specifically recruiting, retaining and managing the new generations has emerged as one of the biggest issues facing employers today.



Armed with her research methodologies, business acumen and communication skills, Claire effectively bridges the gap between the emerging generations and the business leaders and educators of today. Claire is a social researcher and a next-gen expert, fluent in the social media, youth culture, and engagement styles of these global generations, and a professional in interpreting what this means for educators, managers and marketers. Visit clairemadden.com for more info.

Emerging Population Segments [in the media]

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Australian population has grown by 8% in the last 5 years, with 49 new demographic groups emerging, according to a new demographic segmentation tool released by Experian this week. Mark McCrindle joins Mike and Virginia on ABC Breakfast today to explain 3 of the 49 new segments:

1. Greener Pastures

These are above average income earning families mainly with school aged children who in the past would’ve been in the established suburbs but are moving to the semi-rural areas of our capitals, to sometimes acreage, or more often moving to regional areas, refining regional Australia – they’re going to places like Wagga Wagga, Bendigo, Ballarat, Albury, and Wodonga. They are fairly sophisticated, bringing a good connection to the cities even though they’re now in regional areas.

2. New Bubs New Burbs

These are culturally diverse families that really are the next generation, extending to the outer suburbs of cities like Sydney and Melbourne. Whole new green field suburbs are being developed in the outskirts of major capitals suburbs, catering to the needs of this very aspirational generation of what once were working class families but are now professional class with children moving through university as well.

3. Coastal Contentments

These are a portion of the segment of sea changers that have been around for a while. These are people of retirement age that are moving to coastal areas, but not stopping work – many of them are maintaining work or starting a business, perhaps, with money to spend and not slowing down or downsizing. They remain in larger homes where the children come and visit – lifestyle is really on the top of the list for them.


Infrastructure demands in capitals lead to regional surge


As cities are growing at much faster rates than governments anticipated and not keeping up with the infrastructure needed to keep account of these new groupings, regional Australia is flourishing.

People on the outer suburbs of capitals are saying to themselves, “An hour and a half commute each day and the high cost of housing – maybe we’ll move to a regional center, establish a better lifestyle, and get a bit of breathing space on the mortgage.”

It is certain that the strain on infrastructure, the downside of the bottlenecks that it creates, the extra waiting times and the challenges and costs of getting around are creating fragmentation in terms of where people are living and new lifestyle options.


NSW versus Victoria population growth


Mark also mentions growth trends in Australia’s most popular state, NSW, home to one in three Australians. With the size of the growth and the challenge of keeping property prices attainable, we are seeing growth rates in Melbourne greater than Sydney.

Based on current trends, by the middle of this century Melbourne will exceed Sydney as the most populous city. Melbourne features more embedded transport options and forward planning over the past decade than Sydney, so people are starting to vote with their feet. 

Sydney has had a net loss to the other states, while Victoria has had a net gain in population from the other states.


For a more comprehensive look at McCrindle Research in the media, click here to go to our Media page.

Good Versus Evil: Good Wins

Thursday, June 20, 2013

It is easy to become disheartened with humanity when our daily catch-up with the world involves few uplifting stories.


In a recent survey drawn from our national online research panel (AustraliaSpeaks.com), 95% agreed that the media reports more negative than positive news and 93% felt that this gives the impression that there is more evil than good in the world.


It comes as no surprise then that only 31% of Australians think there are more acts of kindness performed in the world than acts of terror. However, the reality is that more good goes on in the world than we are led to believe. In fact, off-screen it is good deeds that, by a large margin, outnumber the bad. Our research shows that for every reported act of road rage, violence or abuse, there are 38 acts of kindness towards strangers. Further, we found that 86% of Australians say they have gone out of their way to help a stranger in need, and 29.5% or 6.7 million Australians help a stranger “regularly”.


Here are more statistics to illustrate this: 49% of Australians say they have been shown “significant” kindness by a stranger, while 29% say they have been the recipient of kindness from a stranger over the past week. Further testifying to the power of good over evil is the statistic that 64% of Australians “definitely agree” with the statement that “good is more powerful than evil” (only 6% disagree).


The Power of Good book coverFor an inspiring look at the best of humanity - from small acts of charity to selfless acts of kindness, order your copy of our book, The Power of Good.

Click here to download the first chapter.

Click here to download this file

The McCrindle Consumer Trends Wheel

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

The McCrindle Research Consumer Trends Wheel is our proprietary device for assessing the impact of 6 key areas on existing or prospective consumers. Demographical, social, generational, financial, technological and attitudinal factors are analysed in this consumer trends scan process. Here is a general example with some of the key impacts transforming today's global consumers. For individualised or targeted consumer trends analysis, do not hesitate to get in contact.


Click here to download the McCrindle Consumer Trends Wheel:

Click here to download this file





Teleworking in Australia: Latest Trends and Perceptions

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Teleworking and telecommuting are concepts (and terms) that have been around since the early 1970’s, but have become a recent reality for many as technology and work culture are shifting.  By 2020, through the completion of the National Broadband Network, the government aims to provide greater opportunities for Australians to work remotely, with the aim for 12 percent of all public servants to regularly telecommute.

A recent McCrindle Research survey of over 580 Australians shows that Australians are eager to make significant changes to their working styles, embracing the freedom to work from home or remote of their primary location of work.


Most would stay longer if offered teleworking


80% of those surveyed stated that they would more likely stay longer with an existing employer should that employer provide them with the flexibility of working remotely or from home. Women expressed this in a greater capacity than men, with 82% of women agreeing this to be true for them, compared to 78% of men. The desire for flexible working arrangements was greatest among full-time workers, 86% of whom expressed the potential for increased longevity in their current role should teleworking be made available to them.


Most would take a pay cut for teleworking


Most employees (52% of men and 51% of women) are prepared to forego a percentage of their pay in exchange for greater flexibility in their working arrangements. While a lesser percentage of Baby Boomers showed such a capacity to forego pay, still almost half (46%) of them would be prepared to put a price on flexibility.

28% of Australians would be willing to earn 5% less for significant flexibility, and 14% of Australians would be willing to earn around 10% less to telework. 1 in 16 Australians would even be willing to compromise 20% of their pay – an entire day’s pay on a full-time load – in exchange for the opportunity to work remotely or from home.


Most are more productive working from home


55% of Australians reported being slightly or significantly more productive working from home than in an office environment. Productivity from home increases with age: While only 45% of Gen Ys report being more productive from home, this number rises to 52% for Gen Xs and 61% for the Baby Boomers. The Builder generation, those 68 and older, report the greatest personal productivity in a home-working environment, with 73% of them reporting greater personal productivity.


Australians spend most of their time working in one location


46% of Australians currently spend all of their working time in their primary location of work. 31% spend anywhere up to 20% of their time working from a remote location, 13% spend between 20 and 80% working remotely, and 10% of Australians work remotely more than 80% of their working time.


1 in 5 Australians work in 3 or more locations


While employers have shown a greater degree of flexibility for telecommuting than in the past, 54% of Australians still work from one central office location. However, 25% of Australians have a second location from which they conduct at least one hour’s work every week, 12% of Australians have 3 or 4 locations that they are based from, and 10% of Aussie workers work across 5 or more locations every single week.


Most want to do some work from home


When given the choice, 78% Aussies expressed a desire to spend at least a certain amount of their time working from home. Of these, 36% expressed a desire to work mainly in the workplace but partly at home, 24% desired to work half their working time in both places, and 40% expressed that they would like to work mainly at home and partly at home.

81% of those employed on a part-time basis showed a desire to work at home at some capacity, compared to only 70% of those who are employed full-time.


More popular and productive for introverts


The benefit of teleworking for introverts is greater than for extroverts. Introverts are 30% more productive working from home than extroverts. If given the choice, over a third of introverts (34%) would choose to work mainly at home and only partly in the workplace, whereas only 1 in 5 extroverts (22%) would choose the same. Conversely, extroverts are 32% more likely than introverts to want to work mainly in the workplace and only partly at home.


But gathering centrally is still essential


In terms of culture and output, the majority of Australians value the group collective, stating that in order to promote the best team outcomes, times for gathering and brainstorming as well as the capacity to work with varying degrees of flexibility is key. Only 18% of Australians feel that collective productivity is greatest when everyone is working in one place with no teleworking options. Over two thirds of Aussies (68%) stated that the culture and output of a workplace is best when everyone is working in one place with a degree of flexibility for teleworking, or when there is a time for gathering and working together but also a significant time for working remotely. Only 1 in 10 Australians would say that productivity is best when workers largely work independently with occasional gathering, and very few Australians (4%) report seeing no need for workers to gather in order to achieve maximum output or develop cultural cohesion.


About this Study: This research was conducted by McCrindle Research in May 2013 based on a nationwide study of 586 respondents.


Click here for the full report:


Australia in 2034: The World of Generation Alpha

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Generation Alpha are those born since 2010. They’ll be the largest generation our world has ever seen, the most technologically aware and the most influential.

What will Australia look like in 2034, the year when first cohort of Generation Alphas are in their early 20s?


1. The population of Melbourne will be 5.9 million (that’s larger than the whole of Victoria today).

2. Australia will have reached 32 million (up from 23 million currently).

3. The global population will be 8.8 billion (that’s twice what it was when the parents of Generation Alpha were born in the early 1980’s).

4. India will have surpassed China as the world’s most populous nation.

5. There will be more Australians aged over 60 than under 20 for the first time in our history (a sign of our ageing population).

6. Australia’s median age (where half the population is younger and half is older) will be 40. It was 29 when the parents of Gen Alpha were born.

7. The most common household type will be the couple, no kids households, for the first time ever eclipsing the nuclear family of today (couple with children).


Source: McCrindle Research, ABS

Note: Projections are based on the current growth rates: 1.1% for the world, 1.6% Australia, 1.88% Melbourne, China and India’s numeric growth, and ABS median age forecasts and household type data.


Mark McCrindle's book The ABC of XYZ gives insights and practical strategies to help parents, teachers and managers bridge the gaps and engage with each generation. However, this book is more than a research-based reference work or valuable 'how to' guide - it is also a very interesting read with facts and lists to which members of each generation will reminisce. 

Beyond Z, Meet Generation Alpha: McCrindle Research

A Dozen Demographic Did You Knows

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Did you know?As demographers and researchers we are commissioned by some of Australia’s largest organisations and government agencies to conduct demographic analysis and forecasting. So for those with an interest in numbers and a curiosity in population, here are some demographic facts for you:


  • Did you know that in Australia for every death there are two births?

  • Did you know that more people live in Sydney today (almost 4.7 million) than lived in the entire nation a century ago?

  • Did you know that in the last 100 years, Australia has only planted two new cities, Canberra (now our 8th largest) and the Gold Coast (now our 6th largest)?

  • Did you know that in Australians have added 3 months of life expectancy for every 12 months of time, for each of the last 100 years?

  • Did you know that when compared to all other developed countries, Australia has the highest population growth rate in the world?

  • Did you know that in Australia there are as many people aged over 38 as there are people aged under 38?

  • Did you know that more than half of Australia’s adult population have completed a post-school qualification?

  • Did you know that a quarter of Australians were born overseas and almost half of Australians had at least one parent born overseas?

  • Did you know that more than half of Australian households have two or more vehicles?

  • Did you know Australia’s population has grown 50% since 1983?

  • Did you know that having seen the completion of Generations X, Y and Z the children born since 2010 are part of Generation Alpha?

  • Did you know that in 2026, India will overtake China as the world’s most populous country?


Source: ABS, McCrindle Research

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