Q and A: 'Kidults' still living at home

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

What’s with the increase of the 20-something 'kidults' still living at home and is it a positive for the child and parent?

The active role of parenting is a longer journey today compared to the past- extending from birth, through the dependent years, adolescent years and now well into the 20’s. This has created some new social trends: the boomerang kids (the large number of children in their early 20’s who leave the parental home, only to boomerang back a couple of years later as the costs mount), the sandwich generation (today’s parents sandwiched between the time and costs of their stay-at-home adult children, and the care of their own ageing parents), and this generation of late 20-something KIPPERS (Kids In Parents’ Pockets Eroding Retirement Savings).

However for all the labels, there are some clear reasons for these delayed lifestages. The rising cost of living, housing affordability challenges, prolonged educational years and consequently larger study debts have put this generation further behind where their parents were at the same age. In addition to the higher costs, greater debts and delayed earnings are the mobile lifestyles, technology expenses and increased travel, all greater than that of their parents.

Therefore for a generation who have pushed marriage and starting a family back, from the 20-something years into the early 30’s on average, staying longer with mum and dad is not only a social option but for many a financial necessity. Based on modest rental costs, this option of staying at home with mum and dad, when compared to even modest shared accommodation costs of $250 per week represents a saving of around $15,000 per year by the time that the saving on some food and bills are included.

However, while there is a financial cost on parents, there is a social gain. Many parents in conversations with me have expressed that while they jokingly complain about the arrangement, the connection it gives with their children, the likelihood of them staying nearby as the grandchildren appear on the scene, and the many ways that it keeps parents in touch with some of the trends and changes of Generations Y and Z are all great benefits.

The key to family harmony in these new households is to ensure that parents and their payments aren’t taken advantage of, and that the adult children aren’t treated once again as dependents. A simple agreement setting out the financial contributions and domestic tasks of the family members, with an expiry date when the agreement can be re-assessed is a practical help. That way we will likely create multigenerational harmony not intergenerational conflict.


FOR MORE INFORMATION:

More on changing household structures can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.


Australian Community Trends Study for the Not-For-Profit Sector: Models & Instruments Explained

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Not-for-profit organisations are invited to participate in the Australian Community Trends Report, a national, comprehensive research study of the sector, conducted by McCrindle and R2L & Associates.

This inaugural study will form the basis for a longitudinal study which will be conducted annual and provide a detailed analysis of the effectiveness, engagement and awareness of the not-for-profit sector. It will help not-for-profit organisations understand the Australian community – the emerging trends, the giving landscape and the current and emerging supporter segments. The Australian Community Trends Report will provide a clear analysis of the social context in which the not-for-profit sector is operating.

The snapshot of the external environment, the visibility of the community attitudes and perceptions, supporter engagement and satisfaction will be ascertained through a series of quantitative surveys and qualitative focus groups. The output will be visual, strategic and communicated through key models and instruments developed specifically for this Australian Community Trends Study. These models and instruments have been explained below.

Find out more about the Australian Community Trends Report Study here.

Giving Sentiment Matrix


The Giving Sentiment Matrix segments Australians and their preferred focus from a local versus global perspective, as well as the charitable purpose with which they best resonate, from advocacy and education to direct action. The matrix plots and quantifies Australians based on the national survey and overlays on these segments the positioning of Australia’s diverse charities.

It will identify 4 main segments which will be quantified and defined such as:

  • Global advocates
  • Community influencers
  • Local activists
  • Overseas participators

Blocker-Enabler Giving Grid


The Blocker-Enabler Giving Grid is a strategic communications tool for Australian not-for-profits to help them understand the blockers to giving and enablers which facilitate giving by Australians. These blockers and enablers developed through both the quant and qual phases of the Australian Community Trends Study are classified based on the emotional practical nature of them.

Net Promoter Score (NPS)


The best global, single measure, cross-industry comparable tool is the Net Promoter Score (NPS). The Australian NFP sector does not yet have an industry wide NPS against which individual charities can benchmark. This industry NPS will mean that individual organisations will now be able to see their score in the context of the overall sector rather than comparing to other industries.

Net Repeater Score (NRS)


The Net Repeater Score (NRS) is an effective measure of post-choice satisfaction and a powerful predictor of re-engagement. It supplements the NPS and is a more pure measure of individual engagement and overcomes the personality influences of promoter measures.

Net Culture Score (NCS)


One of the key assets of Australia’s NFP sector is the employer brand is the employer brand and rewarding workplace culture which is so attractive to the emerging generations of employees and volunteers. The Net Culture Score (NCS) will highlight the staff satisfaction and employee engagement which exists across the sector and which will provide an industry wide score for employer brand benchmarking purposes.

Australian Charities Leaders Snapshot


This scenario planning instrument analyses the key local and global trends impacting the Australian NFP sector. It is an environmental scan based on the DESTEL tool (Demographic, Economic, Social, Technological, Environmental, Legislative trends). Based on the perspective of the key leaders in the sector, it provides a forecast of the strategic trends that have significant impact and probability measures.

Engagement Funnel


The engagement funnel analyses the entrance points Australians have with NFPs. It measures the proportion who connect through the mass advertising and communications campaigns compared to those who resonate around the purposes and cause and those who connect with the organisational brand or charity. It analyses both the interactions that facilitate engagement and those that set this process back. It also helps show how those connected with a charity or organisation can be reactivated to connect with specific causes and campaigns.

McCrindle Participation Scale


The participation Scale tracks the journey of Australians who have an awareness of a charity. It defines the transition points from reluctancy and apathy through the stage of passivity to activity and advocacy. It defines the timeframes of these transitions, methods to best create movement along this scale and acts as a measure for organisations to track where their audience currently sits and how to further transition them.

Find out more about the Australian Community Trends Report Study here.


Social media and narcissism

Monday, June 22, 2015

It seems there is more armchair diagnosing of narcissism and calling people “narcissists” than ever before and social media is often the trigger of it and takes the blame. Narcissistic Personality Disorder is defined by the symptoms of behaviours of grandiosity and lack of self-awareness, an abnormal need for admiration, and often a lack of empathy toward others. While even a cursory look at one’s social media feed will show posts which seem to promote (and perhaps exaggerate) achievements and certainly the visual aspects of social media are preoccupied with appearance, beauty, status and success. While celebrity news and popular culture has for some time been permeated with these characteristics, this last decade has offered celebrity in the suburbs where everyone on YouTube can “broadcast yourself”, personal websites and blogs are de jure, and to exist without social media is seemingly to not exist at all.

Almost two and a half millennia ago Socrates wrote that “to do is to be” while now it seems that “to tweet is to be”. Such is the popularity of such communication platforms, if social media sites were countries, Facebook would be the world’s largest country with more active accounts than there are people in China. Twitter would rank 4th with twice the “population” of the USA and Instagram would round out the Top 10. While the speed of adoption of these communication platforms has been unprecedented- all of this occurring in less than a decade, the reasons for the take-up are varied. Certainly much social media activity is push-communication, with users wanting to publicise their latest activities and status, for many social media use is a genuine attempt to connect, to engage and to listen. However our latest research shows this latter group comprises just 1 in 5 social media users: the contributors who participate via social media as in any community- to share and participate, speak and listen, connect and contribute. Such are these times that the larger proportion of social media users- almost 4 in 5 are consumers, who largely use social media as an update channel to see what others are up to, and when posting something themselves, it is more broadcast and generic than personal and connective.

Most behavioural experts agree that narcissism is a condition not of biology but society- it is the social context not the genetic factors that are causal. In a world of always-connected, app-ready, mobile device saturated living, where every phone is a camera and we are ever just a few clicks away from posting our next contribution it is clear that social media has created an environment conducive to the growth of narcissism. However the apparent rise of narcissism may be more a factor of social media highlighting its existence and narcissistic-type behaviours rather than of itself creating more narcissism. Indeed some of the negative press social media receives is unwarranted. Selfies are given as the ultimate sign of narcissistic times, and combined with today’s must-have item- the selfie stick, an indicator of self-obsession. However most selfies are more “groupies” – not photos of oneself by oneself, but of a group and sent to other friends. Many (though not all) selfies are more about sharing a life journey rather than an unashamed exercise in self-promotion. So too the “status update”, the Instagram account and the personal blog: while such musing and sharing in our grandparents era was kept to a personal journal or limited to a family photo album, the current approach is definitely more public but most of it is a long way from fitting the pure definition of narcissistic grandiosity and an overwhelming need for admiration. In fact the Australian characteristics of keeping things “fair dinkum” and “not blowing your own trumpet” are still part of the local approach. The tall poppy syndrome remains a powerful social norm to ensure that no one gets “too big for his boots” or is “putting on airs”. The Australian values of community mindedness and looking out for each other ensure that empathy remains strong and narcissism is kept at bay- even this great screen age.

Latest media commentary

Monday, June 15, 2015

As Australia’s leading social researchers, the senior research team at McCrindle are actively involved in media commentary. From demographic analysis and future forecasts, to communication of key research findings and the identification of social trends, at McCrindle we are passionate about communicating insights in clear, accessible and useable ways.

Here are some the most recent media pieces our research and team have been cited in:


What will adulthood be like for Generation Z?

“McCrindle – whose business is analysing generational trends and forecasts – says generation Z is characterised by five key terms. They are global," through the possibilities of technology, and through pop culture -–movies, music, brands and language changes make their way around the world more quickly and thoroughly than ever before. They are "digital," thanks to the devices through which they live their lives. This generation is distinctly "social" because it gets a great deal of information not from experts but from peers, largely through social media. They are highly "mobile" in the fluidity of their work and housing. And they are uniquely "visual: in terms of how they process their information: YouTube is their search engine of choice, because "they don't want to read an article about something, they want to watch a video about something."

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE


Treechangers flee city for a cheaper home

Social researcher Mark McCrindle said moving to regional areas was now a viable option for buyers who had been priced out to Sydney’s fringes.

“For that extra bit of distance of living in a region, particularly if they can get a job there, someone would cut down on the commute time into the CBD or into Sydney from where they are in the outer ring suburbs,” Mr McCrindle said.

He added that an influx of new developments and infrastructure being built in regional areas was making them more attractive and had contributed to a change in attitude from Sydneysiders, who are now more open to ’going bush’.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE


More than a fashion choice, the everyday aesthetics of tattooing

According to the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, 22 per cent of Australian men and 29 per cent of women aged 20 to 29 have at least one tattoo.

In a 2013 survey conducted by Sydney-based McCrindle Research, a third of people with tattoos regretted them to some extent, and 14 per cent had looked into or started the removal process. Laser removal has become cheaper and more readily available, but there are serious safety concerns around cheap lasers, poorly-trained operators and the risk of serious burns and scars to clients.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE


IVF isn’t a fix-all for those choosing to delay adulthood

From a societal point of view, what worries me is what demographer and social commentator Mark McCrindle refers to as the "safety net syndrome" – the perception held that someone, whether it's the government or medical science, will solve the problems that have arisen because of a person's own choices. When it comes to fertility, that's simply not possible.

There are, however, promising signs that the pendulum is starting to swing back. McCrindle's research indicates that Generation Z is rejecting the "have it all" attitude of the previous generation and is recognising the limitations of science when it comes to fertility.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE


Victoria’s man drought: Areas where there are more women than men – and vice versa

The female surplus is particularly pronounced in some affluent eastern and bayside suburbs, university locations and “seachange” destinations.

“Females greatly outnumber men in older, established suburbs or places popular with retirees or with aged care homes because they live longer,” social researcher and demographer Mark McCrindle said.

“You also find more women living in locations with female-friendly institutions such as universities, or outer suburban areas with a lower cost of living suitable for single parents.”

“Places where males significantly outnumber females are mainly regional, industrial, farming, fruit picking and military and air force zones. It’s employment-driven,” Mr McCrindle said.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE


Sydney real estate: Narrowest home on the market expected to fetch upwards of $700,000

Social researcher Mark McCrindle said there was a clear trend of Australians moving away from bigger properties and looking at smaller homes.

“Certainly Australians are responding to smaller properties because the trend has been towards unit and apartment living anyway,” Mr McCrindle said.

“People buying homes have already lived in medium-density housing. A century ago, there were 4.5 people per household in Australia. Now it’s down to 2.6 people per household and the Australian Bureau of Statistics forecasts a drop to 2.5 in the next two decades.”

Mr McCrindle said smaller homes tended to be located in the inner city, where there was an urban environment and a cafe lifestyle.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ARTICLE

Why we named them Gen Alpha

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Naming the next generation

In the USA during the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, the alphabetical list of names was exhausted, so scientists looked to the Greek alphabet for names. This nomenclature of moving to the Greek alphabet after exhausting the Latin one has a long history with meteorologists. Scientists of all disciplines use the Greek alphabet as a labelling sequence and as sociologists in naming the next generation we have followed this nomenclature too.

While many people are still gaining an understanding of Generation Y and educational academics are beginning to focus on Generation Z. In Australia alone there are almost two million children born since the end years of Generation Z (1995-2009). With generational analysis having moved from a stage of foundation to consolidation, a more predictable labelling system is being formed. Globally there is consensus on the alphabetised theme of Generations X, Y and Z, but for this latest generation, it is not the end of the old or a recycling of the current but the start of something new.

Generations Y and Z are often referred to as 21st-century generations. However, this upcoming generation is truly the first millennial generation because they are the first to be born into the 21st century (while many Zeds have been born into the 2000s, its oldest members were born at the tale end of the 20th century).

In our survey on the generations we asked respondents what they thought the generation after Z might be called. For many, the logical answer to our question was ‘go back to the beginning’. Generation A was suggested by 25 per cent of our respondents. The respondents who suggested Generation A said the labels also signified what we can expect of this generation and their times: a new and positive beginning for all, with global warming and terrorism controlled. Respondents who suggested the following labels made similar comments: the Regeneration, Generation Hope, Generation New Age, the Saviours, Generation Y-not and the New Generation. Others suggested the label ‘the Neo-Conservatives’ because the upcoming generation will have grown up aware of their impact on the environment and the economy.

Some respondents suggested the label ‘the Millennium Generation’, perhaps appropriate given the fact that this next generation will be the first to have been born into the21st century. However, this label will probably never be adopted; after all, both Generations Y and Z have already been referred to as the Millennials by demographers, writers, commentators and bloggers—particularly those in the US.

Other suggested labels were reflective of our tech-centric age. Many of these labels have also been used to refer to Generations Y and Z and again for this reason probably won’t be taken up: Net Generation, the Onliners, Global Generation, Generation Tech, Generation Surf and the Technos.

Those born globally from 2010-2024 we have labelled as Generation Alpha. If we look at Strauss and Howe’s generational theory, the next generation is predicted to spend its childhood during a high. We are currently living through the crisis period of terrorism, the global recession and climate change. By the time Generation Alpha are all born and moving through their formative years, these threats, among others, may have subsided. If that happens then this generation will begin their lives at a new stage, a global generation beginning in a new reality.


The above is an excerpt taken from Mark McCrindle's book, The ABC of XYZ; Understanding the Global Generations.

Scouts Australia Project in Review

Tuesday, June 09, 2015

Organisations must respond to the times to remain relevant amidst significant demographic shifts, cultural change, and generational transitions.

Scouts Australia is the nation’s largest youth organisation with a membership of 52,000 youth members. The not-for-profit recently commissioned McCrindle to guide the direction of a major Youth Program Review (YPR) through a three-phase project, helping Scouts to engage with the needs and desires of Australian families, their perceptions of Scouting, and what families are looking for in a contemporary youth organisation.

Engaging Stakeholders for Strategic Organisational Change

RESEARCH AIMS

Through conducting nation-wide research, Scouts Australia sought to determine future directions and develop a detailed understanding of the wider community to:

  • Ensure the values of Scouts Australia engage with those of 21st Century Australia
  • Create a program that meets the needs of their appropriate youth target market

RESEARCH TOOLS

As part of the research, a number of methodologies and tools were utilised:

  • Awareness and Perception Brand Testing: Testing the perceptions, attitudes, awareness of Australians and Scouting families towards Scouting.
  • Competitor Analysis: Defining how the Scouts Australia brand is perceived in comparison to other Australian youth development, extracurricular, and sport organisations.
  • Segmentation Analysis: Comparing Scouts families with Australian families nationally and differences in their values for Australian youth.
  • Demographic Forecasting & Trends Analysis: Understanding the factors that shape and influence Generation Z from a demographic and social trends perspective.


RESEARCH OUTPUTS

Phase 1 provided qualitative insights through a series of focus groups with current and former Scouts members and Scouting parents, testing Scouting’s current landscape and the changes needed in the program, thus setting the foundation for the Phase 2 and Phase 3 research.

Phase 2 sought to define the needs and desires of Australian families for a national youth program through a comprehensive national study of 1,078 Australian parents with children aged 6 to 18, asking parents about their values and what a youth program should look like for a 21st century Australia. These results were compared to the perspectives of 1,858 Scouts parents.

Phase 3 featured a demographic and social trends scoping study on Generation Z and Generation Alpha incorporating McCrindle data, Australian Bureau of Statistics data, and trend analysis from McCrindle’s generational experts.

The McCrindle team visualised and presented the results of all three phases at national and state executive meetings throughout 2014 to engage key stakeholders with the strategic changes required to shape the new Scouts program.

RESEARCH IMPACT

The Scouts Australia YPR team is using the research as a key engagement piece with Scouts members and their families. The results have led to significant discussions among members and decision-makers on what it could look like to provide a highly sought after youth program for 21st century Gen Zs.

“One chief commissioner suggested this is the best research we have ever completed. Your work has assisted in giving credibility to the YPR and strengthening the belief of others for the need to have the YPR.” – Scouts


SECTOR-WIDE NOT-FOR-PROFIT STUDY

In 2015, McCrindle is conducting a sector-wides study for Australian not-for-profit organisations and charities entitled the Australian Community Trends Report. Organisations are invited to participate and sign up by 30 June, 2015.

MCCRINDLE RESEARCH SOLUTIONS

At McCrindle we are engaged by some of the leading brands and most effective organisations across Australia and internationally to help them understand the ever-changing external environment in which they operate and to assist them in identifying and responding to the key trends. See our Research Pack for more information on our services.

Challenges facing not-for-profits

Thursday, June 04, 2015

Thinking for tomorrow, planning today

Our social research and trends analysis consistently highlights the speed, scale and scope of change. Only occasionally in history do massive demographic shifts combined with rapid social change, huge generational transitions and ongoing technology trends so that within the span of a decade, society altogether alters. Today we are in the midst of one such transformative decade- which will take us to 2020. Our partners in the Australian Community Trends Report are the team at R2L and their Principal John Rose here provides his top 7 tips for not-for-profit organisations.

  1. Speak to your context
  2. Understand your organisation’s key client segments and their values, knowledge and concerns.

  3. Be seen and known
  4. Position your organisation to be recognised as thought-leaders, influencers, and innovators.

  5. Inspire and engage
  6. Provide a positive experience for donors, clients and beneficiaries so that they not only feel part of your organisation, but part of the issue that your organisation supports.

  7. Finesse, fine-tune and focus
  8. Focus on the important messages and discard what is not essential.

  9. Communicate the need, and plan for the long-term
  10. Finance the future, don’t just fundraise for the now but set up the financial future of your organisation.

  11. Act as a leader
  12. Lead not only your team, but your cause and your stakeholder community.

  13. Be the agent of change
  14. Be accountable and demonstrate the change that your organisation is making.

Not-for-profit organisations are invited to take part in the Australian Community Trends Report.

For more information about the study please click here or contact Kirsten Brewer on (02) 8824 3422 or kirsten@mccrindle.com.au


Sector Wide Not-For-Profit Study

Friday, May 29, 2015

The not-for-profit sector in Australia is at the very heart of our community and shapes and facilitates the values and spirit of our nation. From organisations that provide care and assistance to our nation’s most vulnerable, to those dedicated to providing aid and development overseas, to those who provide animal welfare, promote environmental causes, administer social welfare, and create community and belonging for Australians, the not-for-profit sector has an immeasurable impact on our society.

At McCrindle we conduct comprehensive research for many not-for-profit organisations. In these times of significant demographic growth, intergenerational transitions, rapid technological advancements and social change, the not-for-profit sector is faced with significant challenges in engaging with the new generations of supporters, identifying the most effective communication mediums and messages, understanding brand engagement and retention journeys of supporters and shaping a culture internally and externally to attract, engage and retain staff.

These trends are impacting the entire sector, and so the Australian Community Trends research study provides the opportunity for the sector as a whole to gain an understanding of the changes and practical strategies to respond.

Through conducting an industry wide study, participating organisations will benefit from the aggregated data which will identify trends and provide a comprehensive framework for understanding the behaviours of Australians when it comes to engaging with not-for-profits. Participating organisations receive their own data which can be then benchmarked against the national data. As well as adding significant breadth and depth to the strength of the research, this collaborative approach to an industry wide study will also provide valuable thought leadership material which will promote the work of the sector as a whole. The combined approach also allows for significant research to be conducted for organisations at a fraction of the price of a standard research project.

Partnering with McCrindle for this inaugural Australian Community Trends study is R2L, one of Australia’s leading not-for-profit fundraising and advertising agencies who bring a wealth of experience and expertise in helping not-for-profits strategically engage with their stakeholders.

More about the Australian Community Trends national study can be found here.

In summary, the research will involve 4 stages:

  1. A Nationally representative survey of 1,500 Australians which covers the key giving behaviours and awareness of organisations.
  2. Four qualitative focus groups will be run to expand on the survey findings and to provide greater context for them.
  3. A supporter survey will be run of your donors and their perspectives on giving, communication, future engagement.
  4. A survey of your internal stakeholders will be run including leaders and staff in your organisation to better understand their position on some of these issues.


For more information about the study please click here or contact Kirsten Brewer on (02) 8824 3422 or kirsten@mccrindle.com.au


Top 5 tips for survey design

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

At McCrindle we are well known for conducting relevant, world-class and cost effective research, and importantly, communicating the insights in innovative, useable ways.

Here are our top 5 tips for effective survey design:

  1. Clearly explain the purposes of the research
  2. Respondents will only answer questions if they think they are relevant or make sense to be asked. Explain the purpose of the research from the outset and respondents will be more comfortable answering because they will understand the context.

  3. Order questions intentionally
  4. Make sure the questions flow logically. Ease respondents into the survey but also ask the most important questions first as these are more likely to be answered. If it is a long survey or if there are lots of topics make visible headings and include a progress bar so respondents know how long they have to go.

  5. Be clear and explain
  6. Try to decipher the clearest and most simple way to ask each question. This may mean defining difficult words, laying out the timeframe the question refers to or giving instructions on how to fill in the question if it is unclear.

  7. Unweighted questions
  8. Try not to weight your questions to a particular side, e.g. avoid leading questions such as ‘Do you agree that Australia should become a republic?’

  9. Edit and then edit again!
  10. Make sure you proof your surveys, check the validation and logic. Do a survey preview several times to check everything works and then send it to a colleague to do the same.


For more information:

To find out more about our omnibus survey please download our McCrindle Omnibus Solutions Pack for more information:

The next omnibus is coming up, final questions are due on the 5th of June and the results will be sent to you on the 12th of June.

Q and A: Couple and Nuclear Families

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Are couples set to overtake nuclear families as the most common household in Australia, and if so, why?

For the first time in Australia's history, the nuclear family (couple with children) will no longer be the most common household – while today they make up 33% of all households, within a few years the couple only household will be the most common type of household.

There are a number of factors influencing this transition, including Generation Y couples having children later, and Baby Boomer households becoming empty nesters in record numbers.

Today the median age of parents is three years older than in 1984. The median age of mothers and fathers at new births is now 30.7 and 33 respectively. The increasing of the median age at new births means that households are remaining couple only for longer.

Besides couple only households, other household types are becoming more prevalent. Multi-generational households are on the increase with Baby Boomers being sandwiched between taking care of their parents (the builders) and their children (Gen Y) who are either studying whilst living at home or choosing to stay or return home after moving out, to combat the increasing costs of living out of home.

In addition to multi-generational homes, single person households are also on the increase and such is the impact of the ageing population that by 2036, solo person households will also be more numerous than nuclear families.

Additionally, the century-long trend of declining household size is set to continue. In 1911 there was 3.5 people per household while today there is an average of 2.6 people per household. However within a decade this will have dropped again to an average of 2.5 people. So Australian households and the generations that comprise them are very different today to those of the 20th Century.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

More on changing household structures can be found in Mark McCrindle’s book The ABC of XYZ: Understanding The Global Generations.


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