McCrindle media coverage

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

As Australia’s leading social researchers, the senior research team at McCrindle are actively involved in media commentary. From demographic analysis and future forecasts, to communication of key research findings and the identification of social trends, at McCrindle we are passionate about communicating insights in clear, accessible and useable ways.

We assist our clients in identifying newsworthy media angles in their research to assist them in communicating the insights effectively with the broader public.

Here are some of our recent media appearances:


Sydney is growing by 1600 people per week, which means one new Avalon suburb every 6 weeks. Mark McCrindle shares some of our research results into the future of Sydney, and how Sydneysiders think infrastructure will keep up with this growth, in response to Dick Smith's population growth media coverage.



If you go back three decades, the top 5 countries of Australians overseas born were all European countries with New Zealand in that mix. Today, three of the top five countries are in Asia. Over the next few decades we'll see that proportion of Sydneysiders born overseas, close in on the 1 in 2 figure, that halfway point. Mark McCrindle talks to SBS World News about migration as a key driver of Australia's population growth.



Sydney grows by more people every 13 days than the whole of Tasmania adds in an entire year. 5 million people will live in Sydney by the end of the year, and for young families, the west is where they can get those house and land packages, a bit more affordability and that's why there is growth there. Mark McCrindle talks to Seven News about the Urban Sprawl Sydney is currently experiencing.


Social researcher Mark McCrindle agrees that the e-change movement is a new phenomenon. With the cost of living and commute times in cities increasing — and affordable housing prospects dwindling — people are moving further away from the CBD. “While that goal of moving out of the big smoke on a tree-change or sea change has always been aspirational, it has suddenly become possible now with the new technology,” he confirms. So why are we swapping urban for suburban?

To view the full article, please click here.





The children of Australia are today's students and tomorrow's employees. And while each generation has passed through the student lifestage, Generation Z are the only ones to have done so in the 21st century. They can be defined as being post-linear, post-literate, and post-logical. They have been born into a time that has seen the printed word morph into an electronic form. Education is shifting from structured classrooms to collaborative means, from textbooks to tablets and from reports to infographics and video presentations. 

To view the full article, please click here.



Figures from the Australian Institute of Family Studies indicate that up to two-thirds of parents may be giving money towards living costs, or as a loan or gift to children in their mid-twenties. "The proportion of 25-year-olds still living in the parental home has doubled from one-in-six in 1976, to almost one-in-three today," adds Mark McCrindle. "The main reasons for this are economic - young people today are far more likely to be in the education system later in life than the previous generation were. Not only are they delaying their earning years, but the costs of moving out of home are significantly higher than those faced by previous generations because of the much higher house prices and resulting rental costs. And so, financial independence occurs later in life."

To view the full article, please click here.



As far back as 1996, the Australian Bureau of Statistics reported that 20 per cent of women remained childless at the end of their reproductive life. That figure has been increasing ever since; in 2006 women aged between 40 and 44 were twice as likely to be childless as their counterparts in 1961. Demographer Mark McCrindle says that social trends and the later age at which people start families has created this decline in the number of grandparents. “They are ‘in-waiting’ because their children don’t have kids and they are left bereft of that longed-for role,” he says.

To view the full article, please click here.

Understanding and supporting business in the Hills Shire: The second Hills Shire Business PSI

Thursday, May 12, 2016

2016 marks the second Hills Shire edition of the Business PSI, a tracking index created by McCrindle to measure business conditions, performance, and sentiment through a survey of businesses residing in the Hills Shire area. The Business PSI can be used across local governments and regions to better understand and support local business.

The Sydney Hills population is growing 20% faster than the national average (1.9% p.a. compared to 1.6% p.a.) at 169,872 people each year, with average households being significantly larger than the national average (3.1 compared to 2.6 people per household) and home to a higher proportion of students, university educated adults and full time workers than the national and state averages.

The Hills Shire Business PSI is an important measure for an area that relies so heavily on small business as a driver of the local economy. The 2016 survey was conducted 6 months on from the initial survey and captures the constant change in the Hills Shire region.

Download the full report here.


Businesses expanding and growing in the Hills Shire

The results from 2016 show that the business environment is more positive 6 months on from the last survey with sentiment being significantly improved from last year. Businesses are expanding and projected to expand even more in the next 6 months, with business owners seeing this not only as a physical expansion but also due to increases in staffing levels, as the region continues to grow.


Business owners more positive about national economic conditions

Business owners perceive the economic conditions of our nation to be considerably better than 6 months ago with conditions expected to improve even more over the next 6 months. This increase was also reflected in perceptions of the local economic conditions.


New Additions to the PSI survey

The Net Promoter Score was introduced in 2016 as a measure of how likely business owners and managers are to recommend doing business in The Hills Shire to a friend or colleague. 78% indicated that they would probably or definitely recommend The Hills Shire as a place to do business to a friend or colleague, showing high levels of engagement.

Chairman of the Sydney Hills Business Chamber, Anthony Moss, in partnership with the Hills Shire Council, commissioned the Business PSI to measure the pulse of the Hills Shire. “The Business PSI survey results reflect a true snapshot of business in the region. We are thankful for those who completed the survey, including individuals representing businesses of all sizes including, medium to large (20+ staff), small (5-19 staff), micro (1-5 staff) and non-employing businesses.”

Hills Shire Council Mayor Dr Michelle Burns endorses the PSI tool. “The Sydney Hills Business Chamber and the team at McCrindle Research have done another fantastic job at measuring the sentiment of businesses in The Hills. It’s great to hear that the sentiment is generally improving – however it’s unsurprising that the main frustration of businesses is infrastructure.”

The results of the 2nd Hills Shire Business PSI were presented on 11 May 2016 at the Castle Hill RSL and are available for download via the Sydney Hills Business Chamber website.


 

Why organisations should participate in our ACT Study

Monday, May 09, 2016

Invitation for organisations to participate 



The Australian Community Trends Report is a not-for-profit sector wide study that began in 2015.

For smaller organisations research can be expensive. This project enables not-for-profit organisations to conduct research and also to bench mark organisations against the sector in a very cost effective way. The process is simple, a survey link and guide email is sent to organisations which is deployed within communications, with the analysis and a comprehensive research report returned to the organisation. All information is kept confidential for each organisation involved.


What participating organisations will receive from the study

  • An understanding Australian’s attitudes and behaviours towards engaging with you. What are regarded as giving blockers and enablers? How satisfied are your supporters?
  • Your organisation’s specific data - benchmarked against the national average. Net Promoter Score (NPS) – What is the probability of a supporter recommending your organisation to family and friends? Net Culture Score (NCS) – What is the level of satisfaction and engagement for staff and volunteers?
  • A strategically focused report with infographics, enabling you to easily communicate these insights

Overview of the study; Research methodologies

For further information

This study is a longitudinal study, conducted annually starting in 2015, and provides a detailed analysis of the effectiveness, engagement and awareness of the not-for profit sector. It continues to help organisations understand the Australian community – the emerging trends, the giving landscape, and the current and emerging supporter segments. The Australian Community Trends Report delivers a clear analysis of the social context in which the not-for-profit sector is operating.

Not-for-profit organisations are invited to participate in the Australian Community Trends Report, a national, comprehensive research study of the sector, conducted by McCrindle and R2L.


For more information, please contact Kirsten Brewer on:

E: kirsten@mcrindle.com.au

P: 02 8824 3422


W: australiancommunities.com.au

The 5 Charity Essentials from our Australian Communities Trends Report

Monday, May 02, 2016


The Australian Community Trends Report is a not-for-profit sector wide study that began in 2015. The study in 2015 found the top 5 charity essentials for organisations to follow as highlighted by Australian charitable givers.


Transparency of admin costs

Supporters of charitable organisations are becoming increasingly wary about the percentage of their donation that goes straight into administration for the organisation. Organisations that are more upfront about what this amount is and can explain why it is necessary are preferred by supporters.


Reporting specific impacts and results

The best gift you can give your supporters is telling them the impact of their donation and what it has done. Charitable givers appreciate seeing the direct result of their giving and seeing the difference it has made.


Where donations are allocated

Charitable givers want transparency from the organisations they support on where donations are allocated and where each dollar goes. Showing the work that is done and where it is done is key for charitable givers.


Amount raised from appeals

Transparency of financial statements including sharing the amount raised from appeals is an important item for supporters to have access to. Having this data available and accessible, perhaps on your website helps to build trust with your current and potential supporters.


Details of executives/ governance

Sharing the who’s who of the organisation is more important than you may think for charitable givers. Your current and potential supporters want to have access to be able to find out who your key leaders are so they can be sure the organisation is in good hands.


About the Australian Community Trends Report 2016 Study

This study is a longitudinal study, conducted annually starting in 2015, and provides a detailed analysis of the effectiveness, engagement and awareness of the not-for profit sector. It continues to help organisations understand the Australian community – the emerging trends, the giving landscape, and the current and emerging supporter segments. The Australian Community Trends Report delivers a clear analysis of the social context in which the not-for-profit sector is operating.

Not-for-profit organisations are invited to participate in the Australian Community Trends Report, a national, comprehensive research study of the sector, conducted by McCrindle and R2L.


For more information, please contact Kirsten Brewer on:

E: kirsten@mcrindle.com.au

P: 02 8824 3422


W: australiancommunities.com.au

Generation Z at school

Friday, April 29, 2016

How well are our 19th Century Institutions connecting with 21st Century Students?

‘Schools are 19th Century institutions using 20th Century buildings to teach 21st Century students and we wonder why traditional education sometimes struggle to connect. So if they don’t learn the way we teach, then let’s teach the way we learn.’ – Mark McCrindle

The children of Australia are today’s students and tomorrow’s employees. And while each generation has passed through the student lifestage, Generation Z are the only ones to have done so in the 21st Century. They can be defined as being post-linear, post-literate, and post-logical.

They have been born into a time that has seen the printed word morph into an electronic form. Ironically, today an electronic document is perceived to have more currency, and therefore accuracy, than the printed page. Books give way to YouTube videos. The written word is replaced by icons and images. Education is shifting from structured classrooms to collaborative means, from textbooks to tablets and from reports to infographics and video presentations. Words in this global era are progressively replaced with symbols or universal icons. They have been labelled generation glass because it is this medium that communicates content: glass you don’t just look through but look at, and wear and carry and interact with.

Characteristics of today's learners

Post linear

While schools structure learning by subject, Generations Z live life in a hyperlinked world. For digital natives it is not a subject but a lifestyle. Teachers deliver formal lessons, yet students are experiential and participative. We test academic knowledge and memory in examinations yet they, with the always-on Internet, are living in an open-book world, only ever a few clicks away from any piece of information on the planet.

Generation Z and the emerging Generation Alpha are also the most technologically literate and socially empowered generation of children ever. They are highly intuitive and confident users of digital technology, with Facebook having been around more than a decade, and iPhones, iPads, apps and social media having been available to them from their formative years.

There are 4.5 million reasons to engage Generation Z, the students of today and university graduates, employees and leaders of tomorrow. What’s more, the future of education depends on understanding and engaging with these 21st century learners. In order to fulfil the demand for labour and to ensure the future of our employment sector, our education system will need to adapt to and accommodate the learning styles of today’s students.

Post literate

Note we use the term post-literate, not illiterate. They are writing more (emails) and sending more (text) messages, just in ways different to previous generations. The issue is that literate forms of communication alone just won’t connect in today’s visual world. Today’s learners are a multi-modal generation and therefore demand communication styles that engage multiple learning channels. While the chalk and talk teaching approach was the only style on offer in previous generations, this structured approach to classroom communication is far less engaging for today’s technologically savvy, multi-media, post-structured learners. Though many complain about the short attention spans of today’s youth, this is mainly exhibited in the context of old methods of teaching that largely involve passive models of communication.

Post logical

The language of today’s learners is one that communicates content as well as being exciting, social and creative. They value visual and interactive communication with quick and easy access to information. This is in distinct contrast to perception of the education system where learning and fun are seen as mutually exclusive. Learning must not just be an academic exercise- of logic and rationale, but a development experience- of social, emotional and visceral connection as well. The point is that students have changed, so approaches to teaching need to change as well.

Engaging with today's learners

It is excellent to see that schools and classrooms are responding effectively to these changing learning styles through the implementation of learning stations, shifting from ‘teacher’ to facilitator’, managing more group work, providing real world case studies, outdoor education and teaching through activity-based learning. This, to the credit of schools is how they’ve been able to engage with changing learner needs while maintaining educational excellence. That said, there are still more changes to be made. According to our survey on parents’ opinions on education, over 90 per cent would like to see schools work harder at engaging with students and making learning interesting.

Traditionally, children were pre-formatted to learn within a structured environment, having spent their preschool years in a household where formative character was set through routine, compliance and training. However, increasingly, many children enter formal schooling without such a background and when such a student does not complete year 12, it is said that ‘they failed school’ when actually ‘their school experience failed them’.

While in the past parents, extended family, Sunday school and the Scouts or sports teams all had a role in developing the character, values and socialisation skills of the child, today parents are juggling increasingly complex roles and the average young person is less connected with other formative institutions. Schools are increasingly the one social bottleneck through which young people pass and so have a key role of developing the whole person. That is, in addition to its academic aims, the education system is expected to develop people skills, character formation, life skills and resilience.

The four R's

Real

Not only must our communication style be credible, but we must be credible also. This generation doesn’t expect us to know all about their lifestyle, nor do they want us to embrace their culture. They are simply seeking understanding and respect. If we are less than transparent, it will be seen.

Relevant

Both the content and style in which we deliver it must be relevant to a generation which is visually educated and entertained. There is no point in going to a friend’s movie night with a rented DVD if they only have a streaming service. Similarly, we must communicate in the most appropriate format for those we are reaching. So in understanding the communication styles of our students we will be better equipped to reach them.

Responsive

Education can either be teacher-centric (traditional), curriculum targeted (with a predominate focus on state-wide testing) or learner focused (responsive to their learning styles and needs).

In a generation education has moved from ‘classes’ to individual learning plans. As part of the shift from students confirming to the system to education responding to the changing times, needs and learners.

Relational

The old saying in education circles still rings true for today’s students: ‘they don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care!’ Communicating to this generation requires more than just good content and new technology – it needs engagement and involvement. The more we create an environment conductive to engaging with the head (knowledge), hands (application) and heart (inspiration), the more likely they learning will be embedded, opportunities enlarged and futures shaped.

Listen to Mark McCrindle on 2SER talking about the 21st Century classroom


McCrindle Education Services

For more information on our education services, including research and providing content and presentations for School Professional Development Days, Executive Staff Sessions and Parents Evenings, please refer to our Education Pack below, or get in touch - we'd love to hear from you!

P: 02 8824 3422

E: ashley@mccrindle.com.au

Top 5 tips for engaging the next generation of charitable givers

Thursday, April 21, 2016


Today’s emerging generations are global, social, visual and technological. They are the most connected, educated and sophisticated generations ever with influence beyond their years. They are the early adopters, the brand influencers, the social media drivers, the pop-culture leaders, and they don’t just represent the future, they’re creating it.

To understand the trends, to respond to the changes, and to be positioned to thrive in these changing times, it is essential that not-for-profit organisations understand these next generations and how to involve them. So here are 5 of our top tips for engaging the next generation of charitable givers, derived from our 2015 ACT study of the not-for-profit sector.

1. Developing trust is key

The Australian Community Trends report in 2015 found that trust is key to engaging with the next generation of donors. Potential supporters need to trust the organisation and believe in the work they are doing before they will open up their wallets to donate.

2. Utilise peer to peer fundraising

Generations Y and Z respond well to peer to peer fundraising campaigns. This could include sponsoring a friend in a fun run or giving through a specific landing webpage tailored to the fundraising efforts of a friend or family member. Equipping existing supporters to engage with their own networks is key to connecting with potential supporters.

3. Focus on the relationship, not the transaction

To engage charitable givers with an organisation, those in Gen Y and Z appreciate a giving relationship rather than giving that focuses on transactions. This could include engaging with supporters through social media, in a non-invasive way that still builds the relationship. Thanking supporters for their donation is also key to having an ongoing relationship with them.

4. Be upfront about financial costs

Due to the media exposing charities that have not been transparent with their finances, charitable givers are becoming savvier and concerned about where their money is going. Charities that provide regular communication and measurable results of where donations are going and what is being achieved through them will be preferred by the next generation of charitable givers.

5. Offer flexible giving options

The ACT report in 2015 found that Australians are moving more from regular to sporadic giving and are moving away from giving with a longer term commitment in favour of giving when it suits them or when they have a bit of extra money in their budget. Providing a number of options of how to give is key to engage current supporters.


About the Australian Community Trends Report 2016 Study

This study is a longitudinal study, conducted annually starting in 2015, and provides a detailed analysis of the effectiveness, engagement and awareness of the not-for profit sector. It continues to help organisations understand the Australian community – the emerging trends, the giving landscape, and the current and emerging supporter segments. The Australian Community Trends Report delivers a clear analysis of the social context in which the not-for-profit sector is operating.

Not-for-profit organisations are invited to participate in the Australian Community Trends Report, a national, comprehensive research study of the sector, conducted by McCrindle and R2L.


For more information, please contact Kirsten Brewer on:

E: kirsten@mcrindle.com.au

P: 02 8824 3422


W: australiancommunities.com.au

The Healthy Futures Report

Monday, March 21, 2016

We’re proud to launch today, The Healthy Futures Report, commissioned by the Pharmacy Guild of Australia and data visualisation by the McCrindle team.

On Friday Mark McCrindle was delighted to present a summary of the results at the Australian Pharmacy Professional National Conference.

The research showed that Australians place a high level of trust in their health professionals, with GPs and pharmacists topping the ‘most trusted’ list. In this era of Dr Google, the internet is now the third most trusted source of medical information, but in an era of information overload medical products information and medicine brochures are not highly accessed as trusted sources (just 17%).

While Australians are comfortable with their medical records being checked on an eHealth platform (46% have already registered or are very comfortable), with 55% of Australians happy for their full health records to be uploaded, there is still some work to be done to engage with the other half of health consumers.

The summary results are in infographic form here:

To access part one of the full report, please click here.

To access part two of the full report, please click here.


This national study was a great example of how robust research, when visually designed and printed, and effectively presented at a national conference can engage a wider audience and ensure that the insights get understood and acted upon.

Image source: Australian Pharmacy Professional Conference 2016

Bringing Research Data to Life

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Last week Mark delivered the keynote address at the Tableau Data Conference 2016 on Bringing Research Data to Life. Here is an excerpt of his presentation:

Management expert Tom Peters is well known for his phrase “What gets measured gets done.” But we could add to that: what gets visualised gets read. What gets effectively communicated gets acted upon!

That’s why research is at its best when it tells a story, when it paints a picture, when it’s visual, when it’s research you can see.

World’s-best research will only spread as far as the look of it allows. World-changing data will have no impact unless it is well designed. World-class information will remain unshared unless it is easily understood.

Here at McCrindle, we’re social researchers. But in many ways we’re all social researchers. We all observe our society, study the patterns, and draw insights and conclusions from what we see.

But more than that. We’re all visual researchers. We gather information from what we see, we gather data from what we observe. It is the research that we see that we respond to best. When making decisions, it is the visual cues which guide us. Wear marks in grass show the most popular path, a show of hands, the length of a queue- these are visual research methods we employ to make decisions.

We live in a visual world. Languages are not universal but symbols are. Pictures not statistics connect across the generations.

And so we’re moving from an information era to an infographic era. In a world of big data- we need visual data.

It’s called reSEARCH for a reason, They’re called inSIGHTS on purpose, it’s more about visuals that tables, graphics not just analytics – you’ve got to see it before you can act upon it! Inaccessible research in the form of statistical tables and lengthy explanations won’t transform organisations.

Statistics should be fun- like animation. People should be able to play with data. Research reports should not sit on shelves but be interacted with, and shared on social media, or printed on book marks or beamed onto buildings.

Big data doesn’t have to be boring data!

Data is too important to be left in the hands of statisticians alone. Research needs to get beyond the researchers. We’re in an era of the democratisation of information. For this to be realised, big data has to be set free- and research has to be made accessible to everyone.

Research methodologies matter. Quality analysis is important. But making the data visual, creating research that you can see, ensuring the information tells a story - that’s absolutely critical.

Research that makes a difference has to be seen with the eyes of your head as well as the eyes of your heart. It makes sense rationally, and connect with it viscerally.

It’s about turning tables into visuals, statistics into videos and big data into visual data.

But research can’t be applied until it’s been understood.

It needs to be seen not just studied.

And until the last excel table has been transformed there’s work to be done.

ABOUT MARK MCCRINDLE

Mark is an award-winning social researcher, best-selling author, TedX speaker and influential thought leader, and is regularly commissioned to deliver strategy and advice to the boards and executive committees of some of Australia’s leading organisations.

Mark’s understanding of the key social trends as well as his engaging communication style places him in high demand in the press, on radio and on television shows, such as Sunrise, Today, The Morning Show, ABC News 24 and A Current Affair.

His research firm counts amongst its clients more than 100 of Australia’s largest companies and his highly valued reports and infographics have developed his regard as a data scientist, demographer, futurist and social commentator.


WATCH MARK'S TEDX TALK ON BRINGING RESEARCH DATA TO LIFE HERE

DOWNLOAD MARK'S SPEAKING PACK HERE

Join our McCrindle Qual Panel

Friday, March 04, 2016

At McCrindle we regularly run focus groups for clients to help them better understand their communities. We have developed a panel for those interested in partaking in future research. If you are interested, sign up is free and by clicking on the link below you could be in our next paid focus group.

www.mccrindle.com.au/panel


SO, WHAT IS A FOCUS GROUP?

Wikipedia defines the term ‘focus group’ as a form of qualitative research in which a group of people are asked about their perceptions, opinions, beliefs, and attitudes towards a product, service, concept, advertisement, idea, or packaging. Questions are asked in an interactive group setting where participants are free to talk with other group members.


WHY DO WE CONDUCT FOCUS GROUPS FOR CLIENTS?

At McCrindle, we are about helping organisations understand the ever-changing external environment in which they operate. A key to this is listening to what customers and communities have to say about an organisation, product or campaign. Focus groups helps us to hear what communities really think.


SIGN UP TO OUR ONLINE PANEL HERE

By clicking on the link or the image below you will be taken to complete a short survey, and by doing so we could be in touch very soon about your paid attendance to one of our focus groups.

www.mccrindle.com.au/panel

To find out more about our research and product offerings, click on our research solutions pack.

Lifestyle trends & property market – Mark McCrindle interview

Thursday, February 25, 2016

Social Researcher, Mark McCrindle chats to Kevin Turner about some of the lifestyle trends and their impact on where and how we live and the obvious impact on property.

LISTEN TO THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE

Kevin: You might recall a couple of weeks ago, I chatted to Mark McCrindle and we were talking about the Urban Living Index. Mark joins me once again. Good morning, Mark.

Mark: Good morning, Kevin. Great to be with you.

Kevin: Thanks again for your time. Mark, a very interesting conversation we had a couple of weeks ago on the show about the Urban Living Index. I wanted to come back and discuss that with you again.

Just a bit of fun now, Mark. Let’s have a look at some of the lifestyle trends that we’re expecting to see this year, 2016.

Mark: Probably one of those is just how we work. We’re continually seeing changes in our lifestyles. We’ve seen teleworking. People work a bit more from home. People work through technology. We see even the new developments now where you have mixed planning. You have residential nearby to business parks or offices, and of course, retail in the mix of that. People want to work and live and play and connect in a community, in an environment where they don’t separate each of those.

One of the trends we’re predicting for 2016, we call it power working, which is the work equivalent of power napping. Power napping is where you sleep in non-traditional times and places. You just have a quick zap. Power working’s a bit like that. We get people now working more on their commute. They’re working in cafes. They’re working before or after work, sometimes in front of another screen, even unwinding at night. Work is not just a nine to five, you’re at the desk, in the workplace phenomena anymore; it’s changed. With apps and devices and technologies and the expectation of quicker response times from clients, we’re going to see continual changes in what work looks like and where it’s done from.

Kevin: Mark, of course, with so many people concentrated, living on the eastern seaboard in our major capital cities, I guess that type of lifestyle change is going to encourage more people to move into some of those regional areas, which will probably have an impact on prices there, do you think?

Mark: That’s right. We’re certainly seeing growth in the regional market because they’re being priced out of the cities, and the price rises in our capitals have been pretty crazy. People are saying, look, the regions are not isolated anymore. You have great lifestyle. You have excellent affordability. Of course, the technology, the infrastructure out there is fantastic.

You can get out of the rat race of the city, take a bit of a breather on the mortgage, get some pretty nice lifestyle for what you get out of that house from the city, and of course, the kids have some good schools. Again, the cafe lifestyle and the technology, even running a small business working from home, all of that is possible pretty much anywhere in Australia now, not just in the cities alone.

Kevin: Mark is one of the authors of the Urban Living Index, which we mentioned. I might just touch on that if I may. By the way, the website for that is UrbanLivingIndex.com. A great report. Mark, it pretty much focused on Sydney, but one of the interesting points I noticed is that the high density living in Sydney seems to be increasing. If you look at detached housing around Australia, I think the percentages are lower in Sydney. Are more people preferring to live in more high-density areas?

Mark: Yes, that’s correct. There’s this little demographic measure called the center of population of a city, which is the point in the city where in the whole catchment of the city where you have as many people west as east, as many people north as south. Now, in our eastern capitals, that center of population was continually heading west because the urban sprawls were heading further and further west. Interestingly, in Sydney – and we’re going to see the same thing in the Brisbane market – it stopped; it’s not heading further west. That’s because for each new housing development that is taking place in the urban sprawl further out, you have an infield development, a densification development to the east of that center.

It’s interesting that it seems as if the center of population, the sprawl is slowing because people are now opting for those densified living options. That is because of the location. They don’t want to travel further and further into the city or into the lifestyle areas on those motorways or public transport. At some point, it’s so far out that they say, “You know what? I think I’ll opt for a different style of living, a vertical option rather than just that house with the block out the back.”

Kevin: Yes, if you look at the map that’s on the UrbanLivingIndex.com website, if you look at the spread of the population, I wonder what sort of story it tells between that northern part of Sydney up to Newcastle and the southern part going down to Wollongong as to whether we’re going to see in-fill there. You’re right. You can see it looks almost out of proportion moving out toward the west.

Mark: That’s right. In Sydney’s market, we are now seeing growth in the northwest corridor and the southwest corridor. In other words, where they’re putting in some infrastructure, now we have some metro, some rail lines going, both of those arteries, which really had been devoid of some rail, that is creating some great opportunities and some densification there.

Now in Sydney, we have not just the built-up areas within ten or 15 kilometers of the CBD itself, but now 20 or 30 kilometers away from the CBD, you have these hot spots of densification. You have these 10-, 15-, and now on the plans 20-story residential towers that are around these transport hubs, these interchanges, that are obviously a fair way from the city, but because the shopping centers, the transport hubs, the availability of accommodation, and of course, café lifestyle that goes with that, we’re getting a lot more people opting for that sort of living. In a sense, Sydney becomes a city of cities, and we’re going to see that with all of our 2,000,000+ capitals across Australia.

Kevin: I’ll get you back to talk more about that in some future shows, too, Mark, but I want to thank you for making your time available today. The two websites for Mark are, of course, the UrbanLivingIndex.com website we just mentioned, and there is another one, too, that’s simply called McCrindle.com.au.

Mark, thank you so much for your time.

Mark: You’re very welcome. Thanks, Kevin.

LISTEN TO THE FULL INTERVIEW HERE

ABOUT MARK MCCRINDLE

Mark is an award-winning social researcher, best-selling author, TedX speaker and influential thought leader, and is regularly commissioned to deliver strategy and advice to the boards and executive committees of some of Australia’s leading organisations.

Mark’s understanding of the key social trends as well as his engaging communication style places him in high demand in the press, on radio and on television shows, such as Sunrise, Today, The Morning Show, ABC News 24 and A Current Affair.

His research firm counts amongst its clients more than 100 of Australia’s largest companies and his highly valued reports and infographics have developed his regard as a data scientist, demographer, futurist and social commentator.


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