Aussies Demonstrate the Power of Good

Friday, July 25, 2014

On the nightly news we often hear stories of random, opportunistic crime perpetrated against strangers, but rarely do we hear stories of generosity and altruism from strangers. 

In an age which seems to be marked by “acts of senseless violence”, fed to us by the media on a daily basis, an act of random kindness from a stranger or someone not well known to us is heart warming – and perhaps astonishing. There are, however, numerous examples of acts of kindness that are happening around us every day, but which never come to light.

A fair go, mateship, giving a hand are values that define our national character. When disaster strikes, Aussies are among the first to lend a helping hand.

Mark McCrindle discusses how Australians show the power of good on The Morning Show – that when adversity strikes, whether in the form of bushfires, floods, typhoons, tsunamis, other natural disasters or international conflict, Aussies are front footed in helping out and making a difference.


The Power of Good by Mark McCrindle



Mark McCrindle's book The Power of Good: True stories of great kindness from total strangers highlights just some of the many stories of the power of random acts of kindness, with stories shared from both prominent and ordinary Australians.

To buy the book, download a free chapter or find out more, click here.



Australia's Top Baby Names 2014 Revealed

Wednesday, April 02, 2014

McCrindle Baby Names Australia 2014 ReportAustralia is setting new records in the number of babies born per year – 2013 saw over 315,000 births in Australia! Nearly two fifths (39%) of babies born in Australia each year are named one of Australia’s Top 100 baby girl or boy names – that’s 124,624 babies taking a Top 100 name!

What are the Top 100 baby names for boys and girls in Australia in 2013? Through the nation’s only comprehensive analysis of all the registered births across all eight states and territories, McCrindle reveals the Baby Names Australia 2014 report.

Oliver rises to the top as Charlotte continues her strong lead

Charlotte and Oliver Top Baby Names AustraliaFor the first time in Australia’s history, Oliver has become the nation’s most popular boy’s name, overtaking William who has been at the top of the ranks for the last several years.

While Oliver was the top boy's name in three states/territories (QLD, SA, TAS) and William topped the list in four states/territories (NSW, ACT, VIC, and NT), numerically there were 37 more occurrences of Oliver than William across the nation.

Charlotte continues to be the favoured name among girls, remaining strong in 1st place and the choice for 1,969 girls in Australia.

More babies, less convergence

More Babies, Less ConvergenceAs record births taking place in Australia, parents are being more original in the baby names they choose with fewer babies being given one of the Top 100 names and this naming originality is even more evident amongst the naming of girls than boys.

40.6% of babies born in the 2012 calendar year were named one of the Top 100 baby names, with this figure reducing to 39.6% for the 2013 calendar year.

Names are seeing a ‘Hundred-Year Return’ in Australia

Hundred-Year Return of NamesThe trend in baby-naming in Australia is for the traditional over the inventive. There is a ‘Hundred-Year Return’ theme taking place in Australia, with many of the top names of today also in the top names of a century ago, while names of a few decades ago have fallen out of favour.

There’s a ring to it, and boys feature less syllables

Sounds of Baby NamesThe trend towards short and solid-sounding names for boys and longer flowing names for girls continues strongly in Australia.

Most of the Top 100 boy's names have two or fewer syllables, while almost 2 in 5 of the top girl's name have 3 or more syllables – twice as many as for boys. Additionally, while most of the boy's names end in a consonant, most of the girls’ names end in a softer sounding vowel or Y sound.

The influence of the royals – 12 in 22 current royal names are top baby names

Influence of the Royals on Baby NamesThe original category of celebrities – the royals – have not only captured the interest of modern Australians but continue to significantly influence their choice in baby names.

The new generation of British royals with their traditional names yet celebrity power are influencing baby naming trends in Australia currently. William is the top boys’ name in four states and territories and has been Australia’s number 1 name since 2011. The naming of Prince George has already had an impact, raising the rank of this boys’ name to its highest level since the 1970s.

Access the Baby Names Australia 2014 report below for the latest trends in baby names, state by state analysis, the influence of celebrities on Australian baby names, and analysis of New Zealand baby names.

Download Baby Names Australia 2014. Click here to download the full report.


Australia Street 2014

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

If you live on an average sized street in Australia comprised of 100 households, did you know that of those on your street there is a marriage every 9 months, a death every 7 months and a birth every 14 weeks? These 100 households comprise 260 people, 45 dogs and 27 cats! There are 162 cars owned on the street, which in total drive more than 2 million kilometres each year.

Based on the latest ABS data and other sources, and using this theme of Australia shrunk down to be a street of 100 households, we have developed the below infographic. You can also see the animated video version of it here

So, welcome to Australia Street.

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Australia's Population Map and Generational Profile

Thursday, February 20, 2014

We are pleased to present our hot-off-the-press 2014 Population Map and Generational Profile!

Australia’s Population Map

Population MapThe population map is a handy resource that outlines Australian demographics – city by city, state by state. Australia’s eight capital cities are contextualised by population size amidst many of Australia’s other major cities, and population growth is analysed from state to state.

It takes just one handy glance to determine that while Tasmania’s population growth is just 0.1%, Western Australia leads the charge at 3.4%, compared the national average of 1.8%.

And while the ACT’s total fertility rate is just 1.79, slightly under the 1.9 national average, the Northern Territory’s is much higher at 2.21 births per woman.

The employment and population break-out boxes deliver insights of demographic and social change over the last 30 and 100 years. Australia’s workforce has grown by 2.8 million full-time and 2.4 million part-time workers since 1984, and unemployment rates have decreased by almost 3%.

Over the last century, Australia’s population has grown by 18.5 million people. Our national growth rate is well above the world’s average at 1.0%, caused by a steady growth in annual births and net overseas migration.

Australia’s Generational Profile

Generational ProfileThe generational profile delivers a concise snapshot of Australia’s generations by their years of birth, population size, percentage make-up of the workforce, and education levels.

While the Baby Boomers currently make up over a third (34%) of the total workforce, by 2020 they will comprise of less than 1 in 5 workers. Australia’s workforce is increasingly made up of Generation Y (which will grow from 21% today to 35% in 2020) and Generation Z (comprising just 2% of workers today but rising to 12% in 2020).

Visit our online cart to order the double side printed 420gsm gloss artboard, A5-sized infographic for your desk, your next event, or your clients! You can also download the free digital version here

Australia's Population Map

Australia's Generational Profile

Man Drought

Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Man Drought McCrindle

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The so-called “man drought” is an expression that has been used to describe the demographic reality in Australia of the population of women exceeding that of men. In Australia there are almost 100,000 more women than men, with 6 out of our 8 states and territories experiencing a man drought, while the Northern Territory and Western Australia have a significant male surplus. Currently there are almost 105 baby boys born for every 100 baby girls and so while there are more male than female children and teenagers in Australia, the gender gap dissipates in the twenties and by age 35, there are more females than males.

The regions in Australia with no “man drought” are those with significant mining operations (particularly Western Australia) and large military bases (most notable in the Northern Territory). In the NT there are almost 111 males for every 100 females, and WA has 102 males for every 100 females, with 27,389 more men than women in the state.

Victoria is the state with the highest ratio with females to males (98 males to every 100 females), with 58,399 more women than men. In Victoria there are no population centres not currently experiencing a man drought. However, suburb by suburb reveals gender disparities. Footscray has a man surplus (13% more males than females), whereas a few suburbs away in South Melbourne, the man drought is very evident with 5% more females than males.


NSW: Singleton is living up to its name with not only almost 5% more males than females, but with a median age of just 33 (well below the national average age of 38), many of these males are indeed single. Interestingly, just 90 minutes south is Wyong, where there are almost 7% females than males (almost 5,000).

Sydney makes for a fascinating study in populations by gender, with Pyrmont having 3.6% more males than females whereas the next suburb over the Anzac bridge lies Balmain with 8.7% more females than males.


QLD: While Queensland is suffering a man drought at an overall state level, the drought has more than broken in many of its inland cities, particularly where there are mining activities and Mt Isa is a classic example with almost 12% more males than females (an oversupply of 1137 men). However 1,000kms north east is Cairns with a man drought (1537 more women than men).

In Brisbane, the river represents a man drought divide with Yeronga experiencing the man drought (almost 5% more women than men), while Spring Hill has a man over supply (a whopping 27% more men than women).


SA: In South Australia, Whyalla is home to one of the state’s few places not experiencing a man drought with 241 more men than women. While West Lakes (along with most suburbs in Adelaide), is in man drought with almost 8% more women than men.


WA: Many of WA’s towns have no man drought – Kalgoolie a leading example with almost 10% more men than women, while Bunbury, south of Perth, like many of WA’s costal towns has more women than men (1.3%).

In Perth, Midland has 2% more men than women but just half an hour to the west lies Stirling with 1561 more women than men (almost 3%).


TAS: Every city and town in Tasmania is experiencing man drought – however Central Hobart has more men than women (1%), but just 2km west is West Hobart which has 9% more women than men.


ACT: And in the National Capital, Commonwealth Avenue acts as a man drought conduit with South Canberra experiencing man drought (530 more women than men), but on the other side of Commonwealth Ave bridge in North Canberra, there are 592 more men than women. 

What's the Rush? Penalty Notices in NSW

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Penalty Notices NSW McCrindleIn the last financial year, drivers in NSW paid a record $142.9 million for speeding offences, and more than 1 in 7 speeding drivers were caught in a school zone.

As the roads get busier than ever with the return of school traffic, McCrindle Research analyses the latest NSW Office of State Revenue figures to deliver a snapshot of penalty notices across NSW. This penalty notices analysis highlights the current police focus, which, in addition to speeding, centres on school zones and mobile phones.


Total number of fines on decline, but fines cost more than ever


The total number of speeding fines issued in NSW are less today than they were four years ago, but the revenue from those fines is higher than ever. The average cost per speeding fine has increased by over 53% over the last four years, rising from $151 to $231 today.

“The fact that the number of speeding fines is lower now than it was four years in a state that has half a million more people than we had back then highlights that NSW drivers are being more vigilant when it comes to their speed,” says social researcher Mark McCrindle. “The incentive of higher fines and more speed and safety cameras along with the higher profile campaigns against speeding have all contributed to this decline.”


School zone speeding


While the total speeding fines issues in school zones has decreased from over 200,000 five years ago to just over 95,000 in the last financial year, speed fines are heftier than ever before. The total revenue today is still more than two thirds (23.6 million) of the revenue accrued five years ago (34.0 million), despite the number of fines issued being less than half.

Between July and December 2013, over 54,000 drivers have been caught speeding in school zones by fixed cameras or the NSW police, totalling more than $15.4 million in fines. Only 9% of these drivers were caught directly by police, compared to the 91% who were caught by fixed cameras.

The average speed fine issued in a school zone is now $279 if caught by a camera and $324 if caught by police, compared to $158 (camera) and $262 (police) in 2007/2008.

Today, even for speeds less than 10km/h under the speed limit, vehicles are charged a $177 fine.


Police busiest in school zones in February


Last year, February was the biggest month in which drivers were likely to be caught by NSW Police in school zones.

“As school goes back, it’s not just the children who have to learn the ropes but their parents as well,” says social researcher Mark McCrindle. “With more parents than ever dropping their children at school rather than them walking or catching the bus, driving through school zones, finding a place to drop children around school, dropping children off and finding a place to safely pick them up can create challenges for parents.”


Getting the point: Extreme speeding in school zones on the decline


It seems the message is getting across – extreme speeding of 30km/h or more in school zones is seeing a downward trend over the past 5 years in the numbers of drivers fined.

While only 9% of all school speeding fines are issued by police rather than fixed cameras, and astounding 86% of extreme speeding fines are issued directly by police. Penalties for speeding more than 30 km/h (but not more than 45km/h) in a school zone include a $1,028 fine, 6 demerit points, and a 3 month license suspension if convicted by court. Speeding over 45km/h or more leads to an immediate fine of $2,341, 7 demerit points, and a 6 month license suspension if convicted.


Costly talk and texting: Mobile phones in school zones


In the last financial year, 36,000 drivers were caught in NSW using their mobile phone while driving, paying a total of $11 million in fines. 1 in 50 of these drivers were caught using their phone in a school zone.

Being caught on a mobile phone outside of a school zone is hefty enough – at $304 per fine – but those using mobiles in school zones must foot an even larger bill of $405 per infringement. This is a 25% increase in fine from 5 years ago, when the fine for using a mobile in a school zone was $324.

The current fine ($405) is four times as much as the average price of a hands-free car kit, and the total fines accrued through mobile phone usage in NSW could buy outright more than 12,650 of the latest iPhone 5s.


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Leadership and Generation Y: Managing Generational Change and Bridging Gender Gaps

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Generation Y women have grown up in a world knowing nothing but equality of opportunity in leadership and career. They live in a world where more women attend university than men and they have grown up in a culture which has empowered them and equipped them well for this 21st Century. 

The word that defines Generation Y today is "options." Consequently women are delaying and in many cases bypassing the traditional adult milestones of marriage, children, mortgage, and a life-long career. The median age of having a first child is now a few months short of 31. Women are starting families almost a decade later in life than a generation ago, and return to the workforce more quickly. They are global in outlook, technologically equipped, formally educated and optimistic about their future.

The data below shows an empowered generation of women – a generation that is more likely to have finished Year 12 and gained a university degree than their male counterparts, and is healthier, living longer, working harder and volunteering more. However, the gender gap in terms of leadership roles and earnings is still evident, although slowly being bridged. It is likely that it will be Generation Y women, who at the oldest edge are moving through their early 30’s, that will be the cohort to continue these transformations.

They are a generation with expectations of leadership roles early in life. After all, they were equipped with leadership opportunities and training even in their school years. 

What sort of leaders will Generation Y be? According to our research, they will be highly effective. They lead in less structural, authoritarian, command and control styles. They are more collaborative, consultative and communicative than espoused by 20th century management models. Generation Y are re-balancing the leadership equation with a productivity focus and a people centricity – the head and the heart are being effectively engaged to manage diverse teams in these fast-moving times.


The new generation of women: More educated, healthier, living longer, working harder, and volunteering more


Male

Female

Total Population

49.4%

50.6%

Life expectancy (Years, at birth)

79.7 years

84.2 years

Overweight and obese

69.9%

55.2%

Education: Completed Year 12

84.1%

87.8%

Attained university degree (Those aged 25-34)

29.7%

40.3%

Hours worked per day (All work, paid and unpaid)

7 hrs 25mins

7 hrs 34 mins

Hours per day caring for children (All parents)

3 hrs 55 mins

8 hrs 33 mins

Volunteering rate (All adults)

34.4%

38.1%



Gender gap in terms of leadership roles and earnings is still evident


Male

Female

Labour force participation rate (Aged 20-74)

79.0%

65.2%

Employed persons: % working full time

86.4%

56.7%

Average annual earnings before tax (Median)

$61,776

$55,952

Public service: % of senior executives

60.8%

39.2%

Judges & magistrates (Commonwealth)

69.1%

30.9%

Federal parliament: % parliamentarians

70.8%

29.2%

Private sector: % CEO’s of ASX 200 companies

96.5%

3.5%


For related statistics, see our infographic Gender Pay Gap: Male and Female Average Salary by Career and Industry.


Sources:

ABS, McCrindle Research 2013

10+ Hours of Digital Media [Interview]

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

A recent McCrindle Research report, Australia: The Digital Media Nation, reveals that Australians are spending 10 hours and 19 minutes each day on digital media platforms. 

While over 10 hours of media consumption per day might seem like an incredibly long period of time, social researcher Mark McCrindle in this live radio interview, explains that it is not, in fact, almost an entire day.



Chronologically the time is in fact more like 7 hours, created by multiscreening behaviours. Australians might spend time on their smartphone while watching TV, or answer phone calls while browsing the internet.

Mark also explains that Australians don’t segment their time – that is why Australians have the ability to package such a large number of digital media hours each day. We don’t plan on setting aside 7 hours per day on digital media, but might use social networking at lunchtime or browse the web sporadically throughout the day. Timeshifting and multitasking are adding to our digital media hours of consumption.

Mark delves into the differences in findings across the generations from the McCrindle Research report. Older generations tend to prefer the TV, while the younger generations prefer online browsing via PCs and their smartphones.

While there are a number of benefits with the range of digital media channels available, Australians also seem to be addicted to digital media consumption – people can lose time for reflection and forward planning, and a hyper-drive pace of life can be created which can interfere with sleep and normal patterns of life.

Mark comments on the changing face of media including the fragmentation of digital mediums – while broadcast media has struggled as individuals move to new platforms, viewers are being empowered to interact with programs at a whole new level – tweeing while watching television or reposting news articles to social media platforms.


Listen to the full interview as Mark McCrindle discusses Australia’s digital media consumption on Brisbane’s 96.5 FM on 13 August 2013. 

Australia: The Digital Media Nation

Monday, August 12, 2013

Technology is changing faster than ever, and with that, our daily electronic media consumption. While the growth of these new technologies has had a fragmentation effect on media consumption, it has also had an accumulation effect, with the average Australian now spending 10 hours and 19 minutes each day on electronic media. However, because of the multi-screening behaviours of consumers, like browsing the internet while watching TV, or watching a DVD while being on a smartphone, these total hours spent on technology are not the same as total time chronologically.

This McCrindle Research study surveyed 961 Australians on the number of hours they spend each day viewing, browsing, interacting, engaging, playing, and listening to electronic media channels. The results are not only astounding but markedly similar across the generations.


Over 10 hours of media each day


Young Australians are not the only ones spending an extended period of their day on electronic media. In fact, Australia’s Builder generation, those aged 68 and older, are spending more time on electronic media than the Baby Boomers and Gen Xs, almost as much as Gen Y!


Internet usage top of the list


It is of little surprise that Australians spend the largest proportion of their media consumption on internet usage, currently spending an average of 3 hours and 49 minutes each day online via personal computers. While Gen Ys and Gen Xs are slightly below average in their internet usage via PCs, the Baby Boomers and Builder Generation are leading the way in online web browsing. Today’s Baby Boomers spend just short of 4 hours (3 hours, 58 minutes) online each day, while the Builder Generation also spend a surprising 3 hours and 50 minutes on personal computers browsing the internet.


The generational divide


The 1990’s were determinative in shaping Australia’s generations. Those who entered adulthood prior to the ‘90’s, while consuming new media extensively, mostly consume traditional broadcast media. However the generations who were still in their formative years in the 1990’s and so were shaped by the advent of the world wide web, spend more time online than watching broadcast television. In fact for Generation Y, television is not even second in time use, as they spend more time on mobile media platforms (tablets and smartphones) than television.


Television ranks second, just behind internet usage


Whether young or old, Australians have a strong liking towards television, with hours spent watching television almost on par with internet browsing – an average of 3 hours and 14 minutes for the everyday Australian. The older generations – the Baby Boomers and Builders – spend nearly twice as much time watching television as Gen Y and Gen X Australians. Gen Xers watch television the least, devoting just 2 hours and 2 minutes each day to the tube, while the Builder generation watch the most television at 4 hours and 16 minutes.


Smartphone usage a dominant third


The third most popular electronic media channel among Australians are smartphones – from apple to android, Australians love the multipurpose function available to them through their smartphone. Whether through texting, calling, web browsing, navigating, reading the news, checking the weather, listening to music, gaming, or interacting with a range of apps, Australians can’t get enough of them.


Nearly as much time is spent on PC gaming as watching dvds and movies


Australians spend nearly as much time gaming on their personal computers as they do watching DVDs and movies each day. In fact, when gaming via portable game consoles is taken into consideration, Australians spend more time gaming than watching DVDs or movies.

The amount of movie and DVD watching Australians do decreases with age, but the story is not the same for gaming. Australia’s Builder generation spends more time computer gaming than Gen Xs and Baby Boomers – nearly as much as Gen Ys!


Tablet usage evident across the generations


Since the first iPad hit the market in 2010, Australians have already grown to love tablets and use them, on average, for almost half an hour every day. Tablets are not just being used by younger generations – the Baby Boomers and Builders have also taken a strong liking to the user-friendly interfaces made available and the multi-function capacities of such technologies.

While having the lowest media consumption than any other generation, Gen Xs trump the use of the tablet, utilising a tablet device for an average of 36 minutes each day.


The consensus: Australia as a digital media nation


Australians love digital media, and devote over half of their waking hours to interacting with digital media channels. While different generations engage with different mediums, such as Gen Ys preferring the use of smartphones and tablet usage over TV consumption, one thing is clearly evident: Australians are a digital media nation.

Download The Digital Media Nation Report: Click here to download the report.


Generation Z: Understanding and Engaging the Emerging Generations

Thursday, August 01, 2013

From the Baby Boomers and Generation X and Generation Y, it is now Generation Z and Generation Alpha that are emerging.

These new generations are global, social, visual and technological. They are the most connected, educated and sophisticated generations ever. They are the up-agers, with influence beyond their years. They are the tweens, the teens, the youth and young adults of our global society. They are the early adopters, the brand influencers, the social media drivers, the pop-culture leaders. They comprise nearly 2 billion people globally, and they don’t just represent the future, they’re creating it. To understand the trends, to respond to the changes, and to be positioned to thrive in these changing times, it is essential to understand these next gens.

Who are Today’s Gen Zs?

Gen Zs are demographically changed – growing up in an era of Australia’s largest baby boom since the birth of the Boomer generation, and are living in an era of changing household structures. They are generationally changed – shaped in a society with an increasingly ageing population. They are digitally transformed – seamlessly integrating technology into their everyday realities. They are globally focused through the emergence of global pop culture, global brands, and a borderless virtual reality. They are educationally transformed – moving past structural and linear learning – and they are socially defined, connected to and shaped by their peers.

Gen Zs at Work: How to attract, retaining, managing & training emerging generations

While Generation Z are still largely in the education system and only just beginning to emerge into the workforce, within a decade they will comprise almost 1 in 5 workers. The oldest cohort of Gen Zs are now 19 years old, many of whom are entering the workforce for the very first time. How can employers understand and engage with the needs of these new employees?

Over the last couple of years the realities of massive generational change have dawned on many business leaders. While the issues of an ageing population and a new attitude to work have literally been emerging for a generation, it has been a sudden awakening for many organisations. In fact dealing with these demographic changes and specifically recruiting, retaining and managing the new generations has emerged as one of the biggest issues facing employers today.



Armed with her research methodologies, business acumen and communication skills, Claire effectively bridges the gap between the emerging generations and the business leaders and educators of today. Claire is a social researcher and a next-gen expert, fluent in the social media, youth culture, and engagement styles of these global generations, and a professional in interpreting what this means for educators, managers and marketers. Visit clairemadden.com for more info.

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